Mercy comes in many forms

Students, alumni, faculty and staff posted ways they give and receive Mercy on boards around the McNichols Campus.
Students, alumni, faculty and staff posted ways they give and receive Mercy on boards around the McNichols Campus.

Last week, in honor of Mercy Week, we asked readers to send us reflections on what Mercy means to them. We were supporting the efforts of the Religious Sisters of Mercy, one of the founders of the University whose values color everything Detroit Mercy does. It is part of a social media campaign using #makemercyreal.

University Ministry also set up boards around campus asking people to write about the many ways mercy has been made real in their lives. We’ve collected a few of the comments here. Add your own.

What Does Mercy Mean to You?

  • Actually listening to what someone has to say.
  • Learning to serve the underserved as a Nursing student.
  • Becoming aware that not everyone is the same as everyone else appears to be.
  • Give without expecting something in return.
  • Going out of your way to share a smile and help others.
  • Making friends.
  • I give mercy by forgiving those who hurt me.
  • I’ve received Mercy by the counsel Detroit Mercy staff has given me in time of doubt.

And, in the photograph above, is a note from an alumnus: “I show God’s mercy in the example I lead among my peers. As a proud alum from a Jesuit/Mercy education, I thank God for the opportunities I have been blessed with and hope to give others similar opportunities so we can all grow spiritually and mentally.”

We end this post with the words of Catherine McAuley, founder of the Religious Sisters of Mercy: “Mercy receives the ungrateful again and again, and is never weary in pardoning them.”

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