Gail Presbey

Curriculum Vitae

CURRICULUM VITAE

 

GAIL M. PRESBEY

University of Detroit Mercy, CLAE

4001 W. McNichols Rd.

Detroit, MI 48221 U.S.A.

Phone # (313) 993-1124

Email: presbegm@udmercy.edu

http://presbegm.faculty.udmercy.edu/

https://philpeople.org/profiles/gail-presbey

 

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

 

DEGREES:

 

PhD     Fordham University, 1989, Philosophy

Dissertation: “Hannah Arendt on Political Action: From Theory to Practice,” James Marsh, Mentor.

MA      Fordham University, 1983, Philosophy

BA       University of Detroit, 1981, Honors Program; Summa Cum Laude.
Majors: Philosophy, Religious Studies, English.

 

CERTIFICATES:

 

Graduate Certificate in World History, Wayne State University, 2016

 

Areas of Specialization: Social and Political Philosophy, Philosophy in Africa, Philosophy of Peace and Nonviolence.

 

Areas of Competence: Comparative Philosophy, Ethics, History of Philosophy, Feminist Philosophy, World History, African History, Latin American History.

 

ACADEMIC POSITIONS HELD

 

University of Detroit Mercy. Full Professor of Philosophy, August 2007–present. Department Chair, August 2009 – 2012.

University of Detroit Mercy. Associate Professor of Philosophy, August 2003–2007.

University of Detroit Mercy. Assistant Professor of Philosophy, August 2000–2003.

University of Nairobi, Kenya. Fulbright Senior Scholar, Philosophy, 1998–2000.

Marist College, Poughkeepsie, New York. Assistant Professor of Philosophy, 1991–1998.

University of Nairobi, Kenya. Visiting Lecturer in Philosophy, July 1995–May 1996. Volunteer teaching during sabbatical.

Albertus Magnus College, New Haven, CT, Assistant Professor, Philosophy, 1989–1991

Iona College, New Rochelle, New York. Adjunct Instructor, Philosophy, 1988

Fordham University, Bronx, New York. Adjunct Instructor, Philosophy, 1986–1988

Fordham University, Bronx, New York. Teaching Fellow, Philosophy, 1983–1985

 

DIRECTORSHIPS

 

University of Detroit Mercy: Director, James Carney Latin American Solidarity Archives, 2002–present. In charge of public programming on Latin American Peace and Justice issues (12 or more speakers yearly), planning and hosting art exhibits (bi-annually), collecting and overseeing cataloging of archival papers, and doing fundraising through grant writing.

 

Albertus Magnus College: Founder and Director of Peace and Justice Studies Interdisciplinary Minor, 1990–1991. Created new curriculum; spearheaded having new minor approved, recruited and advised students in the minor, and taught core courses for the minor.

 

Fordham University: Co-Founder and Assistant Director for the Peace and Justice Studies Program, 1987-88. Co-authored proposal to begin the program, co-designed the new curriculum, and taught core courses for the certificate.

 

AWARDS

 

2018: Pax Christi Michigan Purple Ribbon for Peace Award.

2006: Mission Leadership Award, University of Detroit Mercy.

2003: Faculty Achievement Award, University of Detroit Mercy.

1994: Faculty Extraordinary Performance Award, Marist College.

1981: John C. Vismara Philosophy Award, University of Detroit.

 

GRANTS

 

Institutional

 

2011:   Micro-Mission Grant, to bring in two speakers to address peace and justice from Mercy and Jesuit perspectives, in conjunction with CLASA. Funded internally by UDM.

2005-06, 2006–2007, 2007-08, and 2008-09: Grant funded by the Jesuit Community at UDM to cover costs of running the James Carney Latin American Solidarity Archive (UDM) and its public programming.

2006–2007 and 2007-08: Grant funded by the Mercy Ministry Project to cover costs of running the James Carney Latin American Solidarity Archive (UDM) and its public programming.

2008:  J. William Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence grant, to enable University of Detroit Mercy to host a scholar from Kenya, Oriare Nyarwath of the Philosophy Department, University of Nairobi, for five months (January-May).

2000: Grant from the Konrad Adenauer Foundation, East Africa office, to cover costs of East African participants to the 6th International Society for African Philosophy and Studies (ISAPS) conference, University of Nairobi, April 2000. They also covered costs of publication of the book, Thought and Practice in African Philosophy.

 

 

 

 

Individual (research)

 

2020:   Paid Research Leave, for Fall 2020 semester, funded by U of Detroit Mercy.

2016:   Fulbright Hays Group Study Abroad grant for one month curricular research on Afro-Brazilian history and culture, Salvador, Bahia and Sao Luis, Maranhao, June-July 2016.

2015-16: Grant for the Advancement of Feminist Scholarship (GAFS), awarded by the Women’s and Gender Studies Program (funded by UDM).

2014-15: Paid Research Leave, for Winter 2015 semester, funded by UDM.

2012-13: Paid Research Leave, for Winter 2013 semester, funded by UDM.

2011-12: Research grant, awarded by MFA Internal Research Fund Committee (funded by UDM).

2011: Grant for the Advancement of Feminist Scholarship (GAFS), awarded by the Women’s and Gender Studies Program (funded by UDM).

2010-11: Research grant, awarded by MFA Internal Research Fund Committee (funded by UDM).

2009: Research grant, funded by University of Detroit Mercy Professors Union.

2008: Research Grant, funded by Mellon Funds for Humanistic Studies.

2008: Research grant, funded by University of Detroit Mercy Professors Union.

2007: Research Grant, funded by Mellon Funds for Humanistic Studies.

2006–2007: Paid Research Leave, University of Detroit Mercy, August 2006- May 2007.

2006: Research grant, funded by Mellon Funds for Humanistic Studies.

2005: J. William Fulbright Research grant, “Gandhi’s Ahimsa,” 6 months (January–June), hosted by World Peace Center, Maharashtra Institute of Technology, Pune, India. Funded by Institute of International Education, Council on International Exchange of Scholars.

2001: Jesuit 100 Association Faculty Summer Stipend for Course Development, University of Detroit Mercy, funded by the Jesuit Community at UDM.

1998–2000: J. William Fulbright Senior Scholar Grant (Lecturing and Research). Kenya, originally granted for ten months (1 September 1998–30 June 1999); renewed for a second ten months (1 September 1999–30 June 2000). Funded by the Institute of International Education, Council on International Exchange of Scholars

1997: Marist College Travel Grant, for South Africa (conference/research) 8 March–24 March. Funded by Marist College.

1995–1996: Marist College Sabbatical, funded by Marist College, 15 July 1995–14 July 1996.

1993: Marist College Summer Research Grant, for Kenya, 1 June–31 July, funded by Academic Vice President’s office, Marist College.

1988–1989: Dissertation Fellowship, Fordham University, funded by Fordham University, September 1988–May 1989.

1983–1985: Teaching Fellowships, Fordham University, funded by Fordham University, 9/83-5/84; renewed for 9/84-5/85.

1981–1983: Graduate Assistantships, Fordham University, funded by Fordham University; September 1981–May 1982; renewed, September 1982 May 1983.

 

CERTIFICATES: not involving university credit-bearing coursework

 

2017: Meta Peace Team, Certificate of Completion, “Training for Trainers,” June 2017.

2016: The Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies, Wayne State University, Certificate of Recognition for Contributions to the Community. . . April 2016.

2015: Certificate of Completion of the Oral History Institute, Kenyon College, sponsored by Ohio Humanities and Kenyon College, June 2015.

2014: Peace and Justice Studies Association Recognition of Board Service with the PJSA, and Dedication to the Work of Peace and Justice, for Service Enhancing the Fields of Nonviolence and Peace Studies

2002: Certificate of Appreciation, Kenya Students and Nationals Association–Michigan

1998: Certificate of Appreciation for Surpassing Service to the Marist College Praxis Project

1993: Certificate in Recognition of Outstanding Service Provided to the Marist Community

1992: New York State Certificate in Community Mediation

1992: Certificate, Nonviolent Conflict Resolution, Alternatives to Violence Program

1991: Certificate of Appreciation for Campus Volunteer Work, Albertus Magnus College Community Corner Project

1989: Certificate in Gandhian Studies, Gandhigram Rural University, Madurai, India

1988: Certificate in Peace and Justice Studies, Honoris Causa, Fordham University

1981: Certificate of Academic Excellence, University of Detroit

 

PUBLICATIONS:

 

Journal Articles

 

“Sophie Oluwole’s Contribution to African Philosophy,” Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, 35/2 (Spring/May 2020), 231-242. [full text] DOI: 10.1017/hyp.2020.6

 

“Bukusu and Amazonian Perspectives on Harmonious Relations with the Other,” Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture, 23/1 (2019), 1-54.

 

“The Best of Both Worlds: Philosophy in African Languages and English Translation,” APA Newsletter on Indigenous Philosophy 16/2 (Spring 2017), 7-14. [full text]

 

“Gandhi, Dube and Abdurahman: Collaborations to end Injustice in South Africa,” in World History Bulletin, 32/1 (Spring 2016), 5-11. [full text]

 

“Odera Oruka and Mohandas Gandhi on Reconciliation,” Polylog: Forum für interkulturelles Philosophieren, 34/2 (2015), 187-208. [full text]

 

“Gandhi’s Many Influences and Collaborators,” in Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, 35/2 (August 2015), 360-369. [full text] DOI: 10.1215/1089201x-3139144

 

“Globalization and the Crisis in Detroit,” in Perspectives on Global Development and Technology, 15/1-2 (2015), 261-277. DOI: 10.1163/15691497-12341344

 

盖尔·普雷斯贝, 肯尼亚跨民族与跨世代的“国家文化”构建  (“Attempts to create an Inter-ethnic and Inter-generational ‘National Culture’ in Kenya),” 《第欧根尼》(Diogenes), (Chinese translation of article published in French in 2011, see below), 60/2, 2014, 21-38. DOI: 10.1177/0392192113493726

 

“Attempts to create an Inter-ethnic and Inter-generational ‘National Culture’ in Kenya,” Diogenes, (English version of article published in French in 2011, see below), 59/3-4 (2014), 48-59.

 

“Women’s Empowerment: The Insights of Wangari Maathai,” Journal of Global Ethics, 9/3 (December 2013), 277-292.  [abstract] [full text] DOI: 10.1080/17449626.2013.856640

 

“Evaluating the Legacy of Nonviolence in South Africa” (Revised and republished), Journal of Natal and Zulu History, Special Edition: 1913, Satyagraha, Passive Resistance and its Legacy, 31/2 (2013), 139-168.

 

“Kenyan Sages on Equality of Sexes,” Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya (PAK) Special Issue: Odera Oruka Seventeen Years On. New Series, 4/2, (December 2012), pp.111-145. http://www.ajol.info/index.php/tp or http://www.ajol.info/index.php/tp/article/viewFile/88142/77779  “Teaching ‘Philosophy of Feminism’ from a Global Perspective,” in APA Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy, 12/1 (Fall 2012), 4-9.

“Bâtir une «culture nationale» interethnique et intergénérationnelle au Kenya”/ “Attempts to create ‘National Culture’ including Inter-ethnic and Inter-generational Community in Kenya,” Diogène/Diogenes: Revue Internationale des Sciences Humaines special issue on “Community and Africana Philosophy,” Vol. 59, issue # 235-236, 62-80, 2011/3. (The same article is online in the English version of the journal). DOI: 10.3917/dio.235.0060

 

“Arendt on Language and Lying in Politics: Her Insights Applied to the ‘War on Terror’ and the U.S. Occupation of Iraq,” Peace Studies Journal 1/1 (November 2008), pp. 32-62. (See: http://peaceconsortium.org/peace-studies-journal/archives).

 

“Teaching about Racism and Sexism in Introduction to Philosophy Classes,” APA Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 7:2 (Spring 2008) pp.  5-13. See http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.apaonline.org/resource/collection/D03EBDAB-82D7-4B28-B897-C050FDC1ACB4/v07n2Feminism.pdf

 

“Sage Philosophy: Criteria that Distinguish it from Ethnophilosophy and Make It a Unique Approach within African Philosophy,” Philosophia Africana, 10:2 (August 2007), 127-160. DOI: 10.5840/philafricana20071023

 

“Evaluating the Legacy of Nonviolence in South Africa,” Peace and Change, 31:2 (April 2006), pp. 141–174. DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-0130.2006.00351.x

 

“Challenges of Founding a New Government in Iraq,” Constellations: an International Journal of Critical and Democratic Theory, 12:4 (December 2005), pp. 521–541. DOI: 10.1111/j.1351-0487.2005.00431.x

 

“Scrutinizing Justifications for Increased Surveillance,” Human Rights Global Focus, 2:4 (December 2005), pp. 4–14.

 

“Mahmood Mamdani’s Analysis of Colonialism Applied to the U.S.-led War on Iraq,”

Polylog: Forum for Intercultural Philosophy, 5 (2004), http://them.polylog.org/5/apg-en.htm

 

“Sage Philosophy and Critical Thinking: Creatively Coping with Negative Emotions,” International Journal of Philosophical Practice, 2:1 (Spring 2004), pp. 1–20, found at: http://npcassoc.org/journal/table-of-contents/vol-2-no-1

 

“The Struggle for Recognition in the Philosophy of Axel Honneth, Applied to the Current South African Situation and Its Call for an ‘African Renaissance,’” Philosophy and Social Criticism, 29:5 (2003), pp. 537–561.  DOI: 10.1177/01914537030295003

 

“Conflict Resolution: Insights of Refugees at Dadaab Refugee Camp, Kenya,” Acorn: Journal of the Gandhi-King Society, XII:1 (2003). DOI: 10.5840/acorn20031215

 

“Unfair Distribution of Resources in Africa: What Should Be Done about the Ethnicity Factor?” Human Studies, 26:1 (January 2003), 21–40. DOI: 10.1023/A:1022583716722

 

“Arendt’s Politics of Disinterest: Can They Be Applied to the African Context?” International Studies in Philosophy, 35:1 (2003), 85–108.

 

“Teaching and Research in African Philosophy,” (Republication), Aitia: Philosophy-Humanities Magazine, 24:3 (2003), pp. 6–23.

 

“African Sage Philosophy and Socrates: Midwifery and Method,” International Philosophical Quarterly, 42:2, Issue 166 (June 2002), pp. 177–192. DOI: 10.5840/ipq20024223

 

“Maasai Concepts of Personhood: The Roles of Recognition, Community, and Individuality,” International Studies in Philosophy, 34:2 (2002), pp. 57–82.

 

“Akan Chiefs and Queen Mothers in Contemporary Ghana: Examples of Democracy, or Accountable Authority?” International Journal of African Studies, 3:1 (Fall 2001), 63–83.

 

“H. Odera Oruka on Moral Reasoning,” Journal of Value Inquiry, 34:4 (December 2000), pp. 517–528. DOI: 10.1023/A:1004793415638

 

“On a Mission to Morally Improve Society: Odera Oruka’s African Sages and the Socratic Paradigm,” International Journal of Applied Philosophy, 14:2 (Fall 2000), pp. 225–240. DOI: 10.5840/ijap200014221

 

“Should Women Love ‘Wisdom’? Evaluating the Ethiopian Wisdom Tradition,” Research in African Literatures, 30:2 (Summer 1999), pp.165–181. DOI: 10.2979/ral.1999.30.2.165

 

“The Wisdom of African Sages.” New Political Science 21:1 (1999), pp. 89–102. DOI: 10.1080/07393149908429854

 

Akan-Häuptlinge und Königsmütter im heutigen Ghana: Beispiele für Demokratie und verantwortliche Autoritäten?”  (Akan Chiefs and Queen Mothers in Contemporary Ghana: Examples of Democracy, or Accountable Authority?), translated by Nausikaa Schirilla, Polylog: Zeitschrift für interkulturelles Philosophieren, 1:2 (1998), pp. 43–57. On the web at: http://them.polylog.org/2/fpg-de.htm

 

“Criticisms of Multiparty Democracy: Parallels between Wamba-dia-Wamba and Arendt,” New Political Science, 20:1 (1998), pp. 35–52. DOI: 10.1080/07393149808429811

 

“Who Counts as a Sage? Problems in the Further Implementation of Sage Philosophy,” Quest: Philosophical Discussions, XI:1&2 (1997), pp. 53–65. http://www.quest-journal.net/1997.htm See also the World Congress of Philosophy website: http://www.bu.edu/wcp/Papers/Afri/AfriPres.htm 10.5840/wcp20-paideia199823409

 

Zur Praxis der afrikanischen ‘Weisen’: H. Odera Orukas Herausforderung an die Selbstbeschrankung akademischer Philosophen (African Sage-Philosophers in Action: H. Odera Oruka’s Challenges to the Narrowly Academic Role of the Philosopher), translated from English by Jadwiga Adamiak, Widerspruch-Zeitschrift für Philosophie (Munich, Germany) (May 1997), pp. 74–93.

 

“Ways in Which Oral Philosophy is Superior to Written Philosophy: A Look at Odera Oruka’s Rural Sages,” APA Newsletter on Philosophy and the Black Experience (Fall 1996), pp. 6–10.

 

“African Sage-Philosophers in Action: H. Odera Oruka’s Challenges to the Narrowly Academic Role of the Philosopher,” Essence: An International Journal of Philosophy (Nigeria), 1:1, (June 1996), pp. 29–41.

 

“Hannah Arendt on Power, Consent, and Coercion: Some Parallels to Gandhi” Acorn: Journal of the Gandhi- King Society (Fall–Winter 1992–1993), pp. 24–32. . [abstract] [full text] DOI: 10.5840/acorn1992/1993729

 

 

Book Chapters (includes translations and republications)

 

“Defying Stereotypes: An Indian Woman Freedom Fighter,” in Lynée Lewis and Helen Gaillet (Eds.), Remembering Women Differently: Refiguring Rhetorical Work, University of South Carolina Press, 2019, 170-185.

 

“Philosophy of Nonviolence in Africa,” in Andrew Fiala (Ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Pacifism and Nonviolence, 2018, 64-79. Part of DOI: 10.4324/9781315638751

 

“Odera Oruka on Culture Philosophy and its role in the S.M. Otieno Burial Trial” in Odera Oruka in the Twenty-First Century, ed. by Reginald M. J. Oduor, Oriare Nyarwath and Francis Owakah. Washington, D.C.: Council for Research in Values and Philosophy, 2018, 99-118.

 

“Crisis, Dispossession and Activism to Reclaim Detroit,” in Philosophy and Crisis: Responding to the Challenges to Ways of Life in the Contemporary World, Volume One, Golfo Maggini, Vasiliki Solomou-Papanikolaou, Helen Karabatzaki, and Konstantinos D. Koskeridis (Eds.), Washington, D.C.: Council for Research in Values and Philosophy, 2017, 121-129.

 

“Oruka and Sage Philosophy: New Insights in Sagacious Reasoning,” in Toyin Falola and Adeshina Afolayan (Eds.), Handbook of African Philosophy. New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2017, 75-96.

 

“Women’s Empowerment: The Insights of Wangari Maathai” (Republication), in Eric Palmer, ed. Gender Justice and Development: Vulnerability and Empowerment, Volume II. Routledge, March 2015. ISBN: 978-1-138-85259-4

 

“Evaluating the Legacy of Nonviolence in South Africa” (Republished as book chapter), in 1913, Satyagraha, Passive Resistance and its Legacy, Devarakshanam (Betty) Govinden and Kalpana Hiralal (Eds.), New Delhi: Manohar Publishers, 2015, 215-256.

 

“Dorothy Day’s Pursuit of Public Peace Through Word and Action,” in  R. Greg Moses and Gail Presbey (Eds.), Peace Philosophy and Public Life:  Commitments, Crises, and Concepts for Engaged Thinking, Value Inquiry Book Series, vol. 268, Rodopi Publishers, 2014, 17-40. DOI: 10.1163/9789401210522_004

 

“The Role of Nonviolent Resistance in Ghana’s Independence Movement (1890s-1950s),” in Maciej Bartkowski (Ed.), Rediscovering Nonviolent History:  Civil Resistance in Liberation Struggles and Nation-Making, Lynne Rienner, 2013, 51-70.

 

“Gandhi: The Grandfather of Conflict Transformation,” in Emiko Noma, Tom Hastings, and Rhea DuMont (Eds.), Conflict Transformation:  New Voices, New Directions, McFarland Press, 2013, pp. 213-224. [abstract] [full text]

 

“Martin Luther King, Jr. on Vietnam:  King’s Message Applied to the U.S. Occupation of Iraq and Afghanistan,” in Robert Birt (Ed)., The Liberatory Philosophy of Martin Luther King, Jr: Critical Essays on the Philosopher, King, Lexington Books, 2012, 215-242.

 

Government by Fear, and How Activists of Faith Resist Fear,” in Anna J. Brown and James Marsh (Eds.), Faith, Resistance, and the Future: Daniel Berrigan’s Challenge to Catholic Social Thought, Fordham University Press, 2012, pp. 209-236, 363-66.

 

“Should Women Love ‘Wisdom’”? (republication), in Gutema, Bekele and Charles Verharen (eds.), African Philosophy in Ethiopia (Philosophy in Africa Now series). Addis Ababa: Addis Ababa University Philosophical Studies, 2012, pp. 159-181. The same reprint appears in a U.S. published version of the book, by Gutema, Bekele and Charles Verharen (eds.),  African Philosophy in Ethiopia: Ethiopian Philosophical Studies, II. Washington, D.C.: Council for Research in Values and Philosophy, 2013, 139-158, available in print and at: http://www.crvp.org/publications/Series-II/15-Contents.pdf

 

“La lotta per il riconoscimento applicata alla situazione sudafricana come appello per una ‘African Renaissance’” (Republication/translation of “The Struggle for Recognition Applied to the Current South African Situation and Its Call for an ‘African Renaissance,’”), in Antonio Carnevale and Irene Strazzeri (eds.), Lotte, Riconoscimento, Diritti, in the Series Biblioteca di Cultura Morlacchi, Morlacchi University Press of Perugia, 2011, 385-419.

 

“Security Through Mutual Understanding and Co-existence or Military Might?: Somali and U.S. Perspectives” in Matt Meyer (Ed.),  Seeds Bearing Fruit: Pan African Peace Action in the 21st Century, Africa World Press, 2011, pp. 323-351.

 

“Is the United States-Led Occupation of Iraq Part of the ‘War on Terror’”? In Gail M. Presbey, ed. Philosophical Perspectives on the “War on Terrorism.” Amsterdam and New York: Rodopi Publishers, 2007, pp. 161–197.

 

“Strategic Nonviolence in Africa: Reasons for Its Embrace and Later Abandonment by Nkrumah, Nyerere, and Kaunda.” In David Boersema and Katy Gray Brown, ed. Spiritual and Political Dimensions of Nonviolence and Peace. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2006, pp. 75–101.

 

“Philosophic Sages in Kenya Debate Ethnicity’s Role in Politics.” In D. Carabine and L. L. Ssemusu, ed. Ethnicity in an Age of Globalization. Nkozi: Uganda Martyrs University Press, 2002, pp. 161–183.

 

“Should Women Love ‘Wisdom’“? (republication). in P. H. Coetzee and A. P. J. Roux, ed. Philosophy from Africa, 2nd ed. Capetown: South Africa: Oxford University Press, 2002, pp. 361–372.

 

“African Philosophers on Global Wealth Distribution,” in Gail M. Presbey, et.al., ed. Thought and Practice in African Philosophy. Nairobi, Kenya: Konrad Adenauer Foundation, 2002, pp. 283–300.

 

“‘Broad’ and ‘Strict’ Distinctions Proposed by Claude Sumner Regarding Ethiopian and African Philosophy.” In Claude Sumner and Samuel Wolde Yohannes, ed. Perspectives in African Philosophy. Addis Ababa: Addis Ababa University Printing Press, 2002, pp. 76–88.

 

“The Wisdom of African Sages” (republication). In Teodros Kiros, ed. Explorations in African Political Thought: Identity, Community, Ethics. New York: Routledge, 2001, pp. 7–20.

 

“Contemporary African Sages and Queen Mothers: Their Leadership Roles in Conflict Resolution.” In Judith Presler and Sally Scholz, ed. Peacemaking: Lessons from the Past, Visions for the Future. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2000, pp. 231–245.

 

“Maasai Rejection of the Western Paradigm of Development: A Foucaultian Analysis.” In Cheryl Hughes and Yeager Hudson, ed. Cultural Integrity and World Community. Lewiston, N.Y.: Edwin Mellen Press, 2000, 339-359.

 

“Teaching and Research in African Philosophy.” In Luanga A. Kasanga, ed. Changes and Challenges at Historically Disadvantaged Universities. Sovenga, South Africa: University of the North Press, 2000, pp. 133–157.

 

“The Armed Forces Caught in a Web: Both Victims and Perpetrators of Violence.” In D. Curtin and R. Litke, eds. Institutional Violence. Amsterdam: Rodopi Press, 1999, pp. 287–299.

 

“Hannah Arendt on Power.” In Laura Duhan Kaplan and Laurence F. Bove, eds. Philosophical Perspectives on Power and Domination: Theory and Practice. Amsterdam: Rodopi Press, 1998, pp. 29–40.

 

“Critics of Boers or Africans? Arendt’s Treatment of South Africa in the Origins of Totalitarianism.” In Emmanuel C. Eze, ed. Postcolonial African Philosophy: A Critical Reader. Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell, 1997, pp. 162–180.

 

“Is Elijah Masinde a Sage-Philosopher? The Dispute between H. Odera Oruka and Chaungo Barasa.” In Kai Kresse and Anke Graness, eds. Sagacious Reasoning: Henry Odera Oruka in Memoriam. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 1997, pp. 195–209.

 

“Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation: A Comparison to Gandhi and Mandela.” In Lewis Gordon, T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting, and Renee White, eds. Frantz Fanon: A Critical Reader. Oxford: Blackwell, 1996, pp. 282–296.

 

“Hannah Arendt on Nonviolence and Political Action.” In V. K. Kool, ed. Nonviolence: Social and Psychological Issues. University Press of America, 1993, pp. 247–258.

 

“Hannah Arendt on Power, Consent, and Coercion: Some Parallels to Gandhi” Acorn: Journal of the Gandhi- King Society (Fall–Winter 1992–1993), pp. 24–32. Online at: http://acorn.sbu.edu/fall%2092/fall92-hanna.pdf

 

 

Encyclopedia Articles (Refereed)

 

“Sage Philosophy,” Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, September 2014. Online at: http://www.iep.utm.edu/afr-sage/

 

“Afghanistan and Iraq Wars,” in Deen Chatterjee, Ed., Encyclopedia of Global Justice, Springer, 2011, Vol 1, pp 3-6 (DOI# 10.1007/978-1-4020-9160-5_747). DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4020-9160-5_747

 

“War Against Terrorism,” in Deen Chatterjee, Ed., Encyclopedia of Global Justice, Springer, 2011, Vol 2, pp 1139-1143 (DOI # 10.1007/978-1-4020-9160-5_667). DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4020-9160-5_667

 

Articles – Invited

 

Antón Donoso, in memorium (1932-2018),” Inter-American Journal of Philosophy 9/1 (Spring 2018).

 

Gail M. Presbey and George F. McLean, “Foreword: In Memory: The Significance of Claude Sumner SJ’s Contribution to African Philosophy,” in Gutema, Bekele and Charles Verharen (eds.),  African Philosophy in Ethiopia: Ethiopian Philosophical Studies, II. Washington, D.C.: Council for Research in Values and Philosophy, 2013, vii-xiv, available in print and at: http://www.crvp.org/publications/Series-II/15-Contents.pdf

 

Books, Edited

 

  1. Greg Moses and Gail M. Presbey (Eds.), Peace Philosophy and Public Life: Commitments, Crises, and Concepts for Engaged Thinking, Value Inquiry Book Series, vol. 268, Rodopi Publishers, 2014. Ten chapters, approx. 200 pp. In addition to editing, I wrote the Preface (xvii-xviii), and Chapter 2, “Dorothy Day’s Pursuit of Public Peace Through Word and Action” (listed above). https://doi.org/10.1163/9789401210522

 

Gail M. Presbey, Editor, Philosophical Perspectives on the “War on Terrorism.” Value Inquiry Book Series vol. 188. New York: Rodopi Publishers, 2007. Twenty articles, 490 pp. In addition to editing, I wrote the preface (pp. xvii–xix), Introduction (pp. 1–19), and chapter 9 (listed above). https://doi.org/10.1163/9789401204354

 

Gail M. Presbey, Daniel Smith, Pamela Abuya, and Oriare Nyarwath (Eds.), Thought and Practice in African Philosophy. Nairobi, Kenya: Konrad Adenauer Foundation, 2002. 25 chapters, 324 pp. In addition to editing, I wrote the Introduction, pp. xi–xxv, and chapter 23 (listed above). (now online)

 

Gail M. Presbey, Karsten Struhl, and Richard Olsen (Eds.), The Philosophical Quest: A Cross-Cultural Reader, Second edition. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2000, 648 pp, which has over twenty-five percent new material. With co-authored Instructor’s Guide (217 pp.). Overall input on the book, especially regarding selections on African, African-American, Islamic, Native American, and some South Asian and feminist philosophies. With special responsibility that included writing all introductory material for the chapters on Ethics, Meaning of Life, and Social Justice.

 

Gail M. Presbey, Karsten Struhl, and Richard Olsen (Eds.), The Philosophical Quest: A Cross-Cultural Reader. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1995.

 

 

Book Reviews

 

 

Book review of Jonathan O. Chimakonam and Louise du Toit (Eds.), African Philosophy and the Epistemic Marginalization of Women. London and New York: Routledge/ Taylor and Francis, 2018. Review published by Cambridge University Press/HypatiaApril 21, 2020. [online]

 

Review of Bryan van Norden, Taking Back Philosophy: A Multicultural Manifesto, in Frontiers of Philosophy in China, 15/2, 2020, 336-342.

 

“Between Gandhi and Black Lives Matter: The Interreligious Roots of Civil Rights Activism,” review of Sarah Azaransky, This Worldwide Struggle: Religion and the International Roots of the Civil Rights Movement. Oxford U. Press, 2017. Review appears in The Acorn: Philosophical Studies in Pacifism and Nonviolence, 19/2, 2019, 197-202 [online].

 

“Exploring a More Inclusive and Pluralistic Sense of American Identity,” review of José-Antonio Orosco, Toppling the Melting Pot: Immigration and Multiculturalism in American Pragmatism,  in Radical Philosophy Review:22/1, 2019, 159-164. DOI: 10.5840/radphilrev201922198

 

“Die Arbeiten von Odera Oruka: Fortlaufende Inspiration fur eine neue Generation von Wissenschaftlern,” review of Pius Mosima, Philosophic sagacity and intercultural philosophy: Beyond Henry Odera Oruka (Leiden: African Studies Centre, Leiden (ASCL) 2016. Review appears in  Polylog: Zeitschrift für interkulturelles Philosophieren, 37 (2017), 143-148. Translated into German by Britta Saal.

 

Peter Little, Economic and Political Reform in Africa: Anthropological Perspectives. (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2014), in Ethique & Economique/ Ethics and Economics 13/1 (2016), 94-95. (online)

 

Book review essay on Pedro Machado, Oceans of Trade: South Asian Merchants, Africa and the Indian Ocean, c. 1750-1850. Cambridge University Press, 2014. For Nidan: International Journal for the Study of Hinduism, 27/1-2 (July/December 2015), 71-79 (online). Republished as a book chapter in Kalpana Hiralal (Ed.), Global Hindu Diaspora: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives, Delhi: Manohar Publishers, 2016, 177-188. Part of DOI: 10.4324/9781315142937

 

Jonathan Reynolds, Sovereignty and Struggle: Africa and Africans in the Era of the Cold War, 1945-1994. (African World Histories Series) (New York: Oxford University Press), in World History Connected, 12/3 (October 2015), http://worldhistoryconnected.press.illinois.edu/12.3/br_presbey.html

 

Antoinette Burton, A Primer for Teaching World History, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2012, in Journal of Third World Studies, 32/2 (Fall 2015), 300-303.

 

Chike Jeffers (Ed.), Listening to Ourselves: A Multilingual Anthology of African Philosophy, in Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review. 53/4 (December 2014), 767-769. DOI: 10.1017/s0012217314000274

 

“Portrait of a Contemporary American Revolutionary: Grace Lee Boggs,” a review of Grace Lee Boggs, The Next American Revolution:  Sustainable Activism for the Twenty-First Century (2011) and Film, American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs.  Director: Grace Lee, LeeLee films, 2013. In Radical Philosophy Review 17/2 (Fall 2014), 477-485. DOI: 10.5840/radphilrev201491724

 

Elinami Veraeli Swai, Beyond Women’s Empowerment in Africa: Exploring Dislocation and Agency. In Journal of Third World Studies, 30/2 (Fall 2013), 262-65.

 

Bruce B. Janz,  Philosophy in an African Place, in Canadian Journal of African Studies, 46/1 (2012), 156-59.

 

Kai Kresse, Philosophizing in Mombasa: Knowledge, Islam and Intellectual Practice on the Swahili Coast, in Canadian Journal of African Studies, 44/2 (2010), 412-415.

 

Anil Nauriya, The African Element in Gandhi, in Journal for Peace and Justice Studies, 20/1 (2010), 97-99. DOI: 10.5840/peacejustice201020112

 

José-Antonio Orosco, Cesar Chavez and the Common Sense of Nonviolence, in Fellowship: A Magazine of Peacemaking Published by the Fellowship of Reconciliation, 75/10-12 (Winter 2010), 35-36.

 

Laure Arjakovsky (Ed.), Revolution of the Spirit. In Michigan Peace Team Newsletter 15/3 (Summer 2009), p. 6.

 

Anna J. Brown et. al. (Eds.), Witness Against Torture: The Campaign to Shut Down Guantanamo. In Catholic Peace Voice 34/2 (Spring 2009), p. 16. Same review also appears in The Catholic Worker March 2009.

 

Ronald E. Santoni, Sartre on Violence: Curiously Ambivalent. In International Studies in Philosophy, 39/4 (2007), 164-167. DOI: 10.5840/intstudphil200739440

 

Dean Brackley, The Call to Discernment in Troubled Times: New Perspectives on the Transformative Wisdom of Ignatius of Loyola. In The Catholic Worker (March–April 2007), p. 5; shorter review in Catholic Peace Voice, XXXII (Winter 2007), p. 20.

 

Thomas E. Ricks, Fiasco: The American Military Adventure in Iraq. New York: Penguin, 2006. In Concerned Philosophers for Peace Newsletter, 26:2 (Fall 2006), pp. 3–6. [full text]

 

Kuruvilla Pandikattu, ed., Gandhi: The Meaning of the Mahatma for the Millennium. In Acorn: Journal of the Gandhi King Society (Fall Winter 2005–2006), pp. 42–44. DOI: 10.5840/acorn2016/2017161/25

 

Samuel Oluoch Imbo, Oral Traditions as Philosophy: Okot p’Bitek’s Legacy for African Philosophy. In South African Journal of Philosophy, 23:3 (2004), pp. 327–329. DOI: 10.1080/02580136.2004.10751539

 

Michael Nagler, Is There No Other Way? The Search for a Nonviolent Future. In The Journal for Peace and Justice Studies, 14:2 (2004), pp. 217–221. DOI: 10.5840/peacejustice200414211

 

Richard H. Bell, Understanding African Philosophy: A cross-Cultural Approach. In Canadian Journal of African Studies, 37:1 (2003), pp. 138–140. DOI: 10.2307/4107371

 

Kathleen Maas Weigert and Robin J. Crews, eds., Teaching for Justice: Concepts and Models for Service‑Learning in Peace Studies. In Concerned Philosophers for Peace Newsletter, 23:1–2 (Spring–Fall 2003), pp. 7–9. [full text]

 

Barry Hallen, A Short History of African Philosophy. In South African Journal of Philosophy, 22:3 (2003), pp. 89–90. DOI: 10.1080/02580136.2003.10751510

 

Alison Jaggar and Iris Marion Young, eds., A Companion to Feminist Philosophy. In South African Journal of Philosophy, 22:3 (2003), pp. 90–91.

 

Leonhard Praeg, African Philosophy and the Quest for Autonomy: A Philosophical Investigation. In Philosophia Africana, 6:1 (2003), pp. 67–75. DOI: 10.5840/philafricana20036117

 

Francesco Pierli and Yago Abeledo, ed., The Slums: A Challenge to Evangelization. In Catholic Peace Voice, XXVIII:2 (March/April 2003), p. 16.

 

Fred Wilcox, ed., Disciples and Dissidents: Prison Writings of the Prince of Peace Plowshares. In Catholic Peace Voice, XXVII:1 (Spring 2002), p. 20.  The article is also on the Jonah House website, http://www.jonahhouse.org/archive/Presbey,%20Disciples%20&%20Dissidents.htm

 

Bill Sutherland and Matt Meyer, Guns and Gandhi in Africa: Pan-African Insights on Nonviolence, Armed Struggle, and Liberation in Africa. Long version In Philosophia Africana, 5:2 (August 2002), pp. 85-94; shorter version in Polylog: Forum für interkulturelles Philosophieren, 2:1 (2001), pp. 1–17, www.polylog.org/lit/2.1/rvw2-en.htm; and shortest version published in The Catholic Worker (September–October 2001). DOI: 10.5840/philafricana2002528or

 

“Book Review Essay on D. A. Masolo’s African Philosophy in Search of Identity.” African Philosophy, 3:1 (2000), pp. 64–74.

 

Bell Hooks and Cornel West, Breaking Bread: Insurgent Black Intellectual Life, South End Press, 1991. In Radical Philosophy Review of Books, 7 (1993), pp. 22–25. DOI: 10.5840/radphilrevbooks1993710

 

Justo Gonzalez, Faith and Wealth: Early Christian Teachings on the Significance and Use of Money. In The Catholic Worker (June 1992).

 

Paula Rothenburg, Racism and Sexism: An Integrated Study. In Radical Philosophy Review of Books (Spring 1990), pp. 29–32. DOI: 10.5840/radphilrevbooks1990213

 

Edmund Leites, The Puritan Conscience and Modern Sexuality. In Bestsellers (University of Scranton, Penn.) (June 1986), p. 112.

 

Robert L. Veninga, A Gift of Hope. In Bestsellers (March 1986), p. 460.

 

 

Other publications: Proceedings, Short News Articles, Articles for Popular Audiences and some Newsletter articles

“Inter-American Philosophy in Mexico: Report on the SAAP’s 47th Annual Conference,” Blog of the APA, Oct. 15, 2020, http://blog.apaonline.org/2020/10/15/inter-american-philosophy-in-mexico-report-on-the-saaps-47th-annual-conference/

“Moving North, Thinking South: Report on the 2016 World Social Forum,” The Acorn: Studies in Pacifism and Nonviolence, Vol. 16, Issue 1/ 2 (Fall/Winter 2016), 31-35.

Gail Presbey, Sandra Ochieng’-Springer (University of West Indies at Cave Hill Campus, Barbados) and Kunbi Adefule (Cornell University), “Report on the International Colloquium, ‘Toward a New Pan-Africanism:  Deploying Anthropology, Archaeology, History and Philosophy in the Service of Africa and the Diaspora,’” University of the West Indies, Mona Campus, Kingston, Jamaica, April 24-25, 2014. In the American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Philosophy and the Black Experience 14/2 (Spring 2015), 1-5. http://www.apaonline.org/?blacks_newsletter

“Support the Windsor Social Justice Center,” (includes report of conference, “Reclaiming Democracy and Social Justice: from the Arab Spring to Occupy to…” at University of Windsor, June 2013), The Peace Chronicle: Newsletter of the Peace and Justice Studies Association Spring-Summer 2013, 22.

“SOA Watch Delegation to Honduras, May 2011” in Radical Philosophy Association Newsletter New issue, no. 8 (November 2011), pp. 9-12. Find at:  http://www.radicalphilosophyassociation.org/uploads/3/8/4/9/3849251/rpa_newsletter_8_3.pdf

“Blind to Suffering:  The James Carney, S.J., Story,” in Conversations on Jesuit Higher Education vol. 40 (Fall 2011), pp. 56-57, http://epublications.marquette.edu/conversations/vol40/iss1/29/

Report on the conference, “Shaping the Future:  Networking Jesuit Higher Education for a Globalizing World, Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico City, April 21-25, 2010, University of Detroit Mercy website, http://www.udmercy.edu/mission/university/jesuit-mercy/sponsors/jesuit-community/2010-intl-jesuit-hied-conf.htm (removed by 8-25-20)

“Franz Jagerstatter,” On the Edge: A Detroit Catholic Worker Newsletter (Winter 2008), pp. 6-7, http://www.dayhouse.org/ontheedgewinter2008.pdf

 

“Secularism and Rationality in Odera Oruka’s Sage Philosophy Project,” in Proceedings of the XXII World Congress of Philosophy 28:121-128 (2008).

 

“Dr. David Abdullai, ‘Mother Teresa of Africa,’ Serves the Sick and Poor in Ghana,” Catholic Peace Voice, XXXI:3 (Fall 2006), p. 15.

 

“Walking with Gandhi in India,” Concerned Philosophers for Peace Newsletter (Fall 2006), pp. 1, 12–17.  http://peacephilosophy.org/95/walking-with-gandhi-at-100-by-gail-presbey

“Simone Weil y el trabajo manual: Sus ideas Aplicadas al Actual Trabajo de Explotación”, translation by Ada Frey y Karina Crivelli, Centro Para La Justica Global, posted on the web at: https://www.globaljusticecenter.org/es/ponencias/simone-weil-y-el-trabajo-manual-sus-ideas-aplicadas-al-actual-trabajo-de-explotaci%C3%B3n

“Simone Weil On Labor: Her Insights Applied to Current Sweatshop Labor,” Center for Global Justice, 2005, on web at: https://www.globaljusticecenter.org/es/ponencias/simone-weil-y-el-trabajo-manual-sus-ideas-aplicadas-al-actual-trabajo-de-explotaci%C3%B3n

 

Conference report on “A Call to Solidarity with Africa: Americans and Africans in Dialogue about Africa’s Promise, Needs, and Image,” (University of Notre Dame) Catholic Peace Voice (March–April 2004), p. 5.

 

“Istanbul: Days and Nights at the World Congress of Philosophy,” Concerned Philosophers for Peace Newsletter, 23:1–2 (Spring–Fall 2003), pp. 1, 9–14.

 

“Dan Berrigan Reads his Poetry in Detroit,” On the Edge: A Detroit Catholic Worker Newsletter (Autumn 2002), pp. 3, 11.

 

“Black Hawk Down: Somali and U. S. Perspectives on the “Day of the Rangers” (October 3, 1993).” Agenda (Ann Arbor, Mich., April 2002), pp. 5–9; shorter version in Green House News (Ferndale, Mich.) (May 2002), p. 4. Online at http://www-personal.umich.edu/~lormand/agenda/0204/blackhawkdown.htm

 

“Course Syllabus for African Philosophy and Culture.” American Philosophical Association Newsletter for Philosophy and the Black Experience (Spring 2001), pp. 41–48.

 

“The Struggle for Recognition in the Philosophy of Axel Honneth Applied to the African Renaissance.” In The African and European Origins of the Renaissance and their Contribution to Human Development. Johannesburg, South Africa: Goethe Institute, 1999, pp. 64–92.

 

Philosophie in Afrika, des XX. Philosophie-Weltcongresses in Boston,” (Philosophy in Africa: The Twentieth Philosophy World Congress in Boston), Polylog: Zeitschrift für interkulturelles Philosophieren, 1:2 (1998), pp. 121–122. Translation by Anke Graness.

 

“Who Counts as a Sage? Problems in the Further Implementation of Sage Philosophy,” Paideia Archive: Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy, 1998. http://www.bu.edu/wcp/Papers/Afri/AfriPres.htm DOI:10.5840/wcp20-paideia199823409

 

 

Research Reports for Non-Governmental Organizations, completed

 

“Conflict Resolution in Dadaab Refugee Camp,” 173 pp. Report commissioned by Care-International of Kenya, completed and presented to Care and to UNHCR representatives, Nairobi Kenya, August 2001.

 

 

 

 

For a complete list of citations of Gail Presbey’s research publications by other authors, please see the end of this CV.

 

Presentations at Conferences, Peer-reviewed (unless clearly marked as Invited)

 

 

Presented paper, “The Problem of using Anger as a Motivator for Social Change,” on the panel, “Anger’s Role in Peace and Justice,” Central American Philosophical Association conference, on Zoom, February 25, 2021.

 

Presented paper, “Gandhi’s Distinct Contribution to Nonviolent Strategy and Tactics, as Enacted by Subsequent Activists,” Concerned Philosophers for Peace conference, ‘peace and Hope in Dark Times’ on January 29-30, 2021. Zoom conference hosted by Texas State University and Pellissippi State Community College.

 

Presented paper, “A Peace and Justice Loving Philosopher in War: Wamba-dia-Wamba and his role in the War in Congo,” Asixoxe (Let’s Talk!) Conference on African Philosophy: “Africa in a Cosmopolitan and Polycentric World: Violence, Conflict Mediation, and Peace Building Dynamics,” Centre of Global Studies, IP CAS, Prague, (via Zoom), June 2020.

 

Panel commentator (invited) for “Pragmatist Feminism, Hospitality and Pedagogy” at the Society for the Advancement of America Philosophy conference on Inter-American Philosophy at Hacienda Santa Clara (Texas A and M), San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, March 2020.

 

Panel co-organizer and Roundtable participant, for Roundtable: Sophie Bọsẹdé Olúwọlé: Life and Legacy, African Studies Association conference, Boston, MA November 2019.

 

Presented a paper, “Commemorations of Gandhi’s Salt March of 1930,” at Peace History Society conference, “Commemorating Violent Conflict: Building Sustainable Peace,” Kent State University, October 2019.

 

Plenary speaker on the topic of “Women’s Contribution to the Development of Gandhi’s Nonviolent Resistance Tactics in South Africa” at “Gandhi’s Global Legacy – International Conference,” California State University – Fresno, October 2019.

 

Presented a paper, “Contemporary Neocolonialism and Dispossession and the Response of the Poor People’s Campaign,” at a “Philosophy in the City” conference, held at University of Detroit Mercy, October 2019.

 

Presented a paper, “1968 Detroit as a Global City: Kenyans at Wayne State University,” World History Association conference, San Juan, Puerto Rico, June 2019.

 

Presented a paper, “Teaching Introduction to Philosophy with van Norden’s Taking Back Philosophy,” at the Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy conference, Bath Spa University, Bath, England, June 2019.

 

Presented a paper, “Positive Action as proposed in Nkrumah’s Newspapers,” on the panel, “Pan-Africanism between Unity and Divergence (His07),” at the European Conference on African Studies, University of Edinburgh, June 2019.

 

Presented a paper, “Contemporary Neocolonialism and Dispossession” for the Concerned Philosophers for Peace conference, University of Colorado at Boulder, October 2018.

 

Presented a paper on a Roundtable, “Re-learning to be Human For/in Global Times: A Feminist Perspective. World Congress of Philosophy, Beijing, China, August 2018.

 

Presented a paper on “Harmonious Relations with others and the insights of Indigenous Philosophy: Bukusu and Amazonian perspectives” for the panel, “The Value of a Relational Concept of Being Human, in an Intercultural Perspective.”  World Congress of Philosophy, Beijing, China, August 2018.

 

Presented a paper, “Oruka and Momoh on Techniques of Interviewing Sages on Philosophical topics,” panel entitled “African Intellectual Traditions in Conversation,” African Studies Association 60th Annual Meeting, Chicago IL, November 2017.

 

Roundtable/ Author Meets Critics panel participant for book by Omedi Ochieng, Groundwork for the Practice of the Good Life:  Politics and Ethics at the Intersection of the North Atlantic and African Philosophy. African Studies Association 60th Annual Meeting, Chicago IL, November 2017.

 

Presented a paper, “Reflections on Du Bois’ Analysis of the Causes of World War One, and his plan for World Peace,” Peace History Society conference, “Remembering Muted Voices:  Conscience, Dissent, Resistance and Civil Liberties in World War I Through Today,” World War One Museum, October 2017.

 

Presented a paper, “The Development of Padmore and James’ Pan-African Liberation Strategy: Their Reflections on Striking Oil workers in Trinidad, 1937.” World History Association conference, Northeastern University, June 2017.

 

Presented a paper, “Brazil’s Filhos de Gandhy Afoxé Addresses Sexism, Homophobia and other Contemporary Issues” at La Academia del Pueblo Research Conference, “Charting New Futures: Rethinking Race and Gender in LatinX USA and Beyond.” Wayne State University, April 2017.

 

Presenter at a panel on book of Chike Jeffers (Ed.), Listening to Ourselves: A Multilingual Anthology of African Philosophy. Panel sponsored by the Committee on Indigenous Philosophers, American Philosophical Association Eastern Division conference, Baltimore MD, January 2017.

 

Presented paper, “The Philosophy of Brazilian ‘Filhos de Gandhy’: African and Indian influences, for panel on Lusophone African philosophy, African Studies Association conference, Washington D.C., December 2016.

 

Plenary Speaker, “Ecological Ethics Modeled on the Family: The Question of Women’s Status,” International Colloquium on Marginalization in African Philosophy: Women and Environment, a collaboration of University of Calabar, Nigeria and University of Johannesburg, South Africa, partnering with Bassey Andah Institute for African and Asian Studies and Calabar School of Philosophy, Calabar, Nigeria, September 2016.

 

Presented paper, “Remembering and Recounting Religious Experience: An Interview with Alice Lakwena,” for conference on “Memory and Remembrance in Africa and the Diaspora,” International Society for the Oral Literature of Africa (ISOLA), University of Florida-Gainesville, May 2016.

 

Presented paper, “Insights for Today from the Amuesha of Peru regarding Ethics, Forgiveness, and Reconciliation,” 7th Annual La Academia del Pueblo Latino/a and Latin American Research Conference, “Decolonizing the Mind: Knowledge from the Margins,” Wayne State University, April 2016.

 

Presented paper, “Women’s Rights and Citizenship in Kenya Since Independence,” at Wayne State University’s Center for the Study of Citizenship conference on “Gender Sexuality, and Citizenship,” April 2016.

 

Presented paper, “The Ethics of Compassion of the Amuesha of Peru Compared and Contrasted to Mohism and Daoism of Ancient China,” Annual Conference of The Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy, theme: “Inter-American Philosophy,” Panel co-sponsored by the Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy, Portland State University/ Benson Hotel, Portland Oregon, March 2016.

 

Presented paper, “The Wide Variety of Influences on Odera Oruka’s Political Philosophy,” at the African Studies Association conference, San Diego CA, November 2015.

 

Presented paper, “Ethics of Compassion: East African Ethics compared to the Amuesha of Peru,” International Society for African Philosophy and Studies (ISAPS) conference, Howard University, November 2015.

 

Presented a paper, “Gandhi’s views on Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism during the British Rule of India,” Peace History Association conference, University of St. Joseph, Hartford CT, October 2015.

 

Presented paper, “The role of the British suffragettes in influencing women’s nonviolent protest in South Africa, 1907-1913,” Midwest Conference on British Studies, Wayne State University, September 2015.

 

Presented paper, “Nkrumah’s Newspapers: Giving Voice to a Local Variation of a Global Nonviolent Movement of Liberation,” World History Association conference, Savannah GA, July 2015.

 

Presented power point, “Nonviolent Protest of South African Pass Laws, 1913: Transformation and Tactics,” on roundtable, “Assertion and Contention along the Color Line in the Early Twentieth-Century World,” Southeast World History Association conference, Savannah GA, June 2015.

 

Presented paper, “Conceptions of Self as Individual or Relational: Its impact on Acceptance of Economic Democracy,” at the Global Studies Association conference, “Globalization: The Urban Crisis and Economic Democracy,” University of Toledo, June 2015.

 

Invited keynote address, “Odera Oruka and Mohandas Gandhi on reconciliation,” at Reconciliation and Justice: 5th Intercultural Interdisciplinary Colloquium at the Institute for Science and Art (IWK) in cooperation with Viennese Society for Intercultural Philosophy (WiGiP), Institute of Philosophy at the University of Vienna, and Forum Scientiarum at the University of Tübingen, Vienna, May 2015.

 

“Thoreau, the Bhagavad Gita and Gandhi,” paper presented at Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 42nd annual conference (on “Sustainability”), Grand Valley State University, March 2015.

 

“Crisis, Dispossession, and Activism to Reclaim Detroit,” paper presented at Radical Philosophy Association conference on “Spaces of Control: Confronting Austerity and Repression,” Stony Brook University, November 2014.

 

“Gandhi’s Followers: Interviews with Lifelong Gandhi Activists,” paper presented at the Peace and Justice Studies Association conference on “Courageous Presence:  Shifting Stories and Practices of Peace,” University of San Diego, October 2014.

 

“Nkrumah’s Newspapers:  Popularizing Nonviolent Action,” paper presented at Southeastern World History Association Conference, “Peace and Human Rights in World History,” Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton FL, October 2014.

 

Presentation (power point), “Kenyan and Ethiopian Sages on Good Governance and Conflict Resolution,” at the conference, “Challenges of Good Governance and Leadership for Sustainable Development of African States” hosted by the Center for African Development Policy Research (CADPR)  at Western Michigan University, August 2014.

 

Presented paper, “A Study of Moral Ambivalence (as described by David Wong) Regarding Individualism and Communitarian Values as Articulated in the Works of African Philosophers,” Society for Asian and Contemporary Philosophy 49th annual conference on “Universality and Particularity,” Binghamton University (SUNY), June 2014.

 

Presented paper, “Teaching Ethics from a Global Studies perspective,” at the Global Studies Association conference, Loyola University Chicago, June 2014.

 

Presented paper, “The Development of Padmore and James’ Pan-African Liberation Strategy: Their Reflections on Striking Oil workers in Trinidad, 1937, and Striking Dockworkers in Kingston, Jamaica, 1938,” presented at “Toward a New Pan-Africanism,” University of West Indies – Mona campus, Jamaica, April 2014.

 

Presented paper, “Odera Oruka’s Position on the Equality of Women: The Kenyan Context,” and participant on a special panel, “Discussion of H. Odera Oruka’s Sage Philosophy,”  Symposium on H. Odera Oruka, Goethe-Institut and University of Nairobi, Kenya, November, 2013.

 

“John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s Campaigns for Peace Compared and Contrasted to Gandhi’s Methods of Nonviolent Action,” presented at “Peace Studies between Tradition and Innovation,” Peace and Justice Studies Association conference, Wilfred Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, October 2013.

 

“Concepts and Practices of Women’s Empowerment in East Africa,” presented at “Kenya at 50: Lessons for the Future” conference, Kenya Scholars and Studies Association (KESSA), Bowling Green State University, September 2013.

 

“Globalizing Philosophy,” (Invited) panel participant, and “Women Philosophers and the Enrichment of Philosophy,” roundtable presenter (Invited). Both presentations at XXIII World Congress of Philosophy, “Philosophy and Inquiry as a Way of Life,” University of Athens, School of Philosophy, August 2013.

 

“Nonviolence as a Way of Life: India and Africa,” paper presented at conference, “Culture and Philosophy as Ways of Life in Times of Global Change,” Council for Research and Values in Philosophy, University of Athens, School of Philosophy, August 2013.

 

Presented paper, “Crisis, Opportunity, and Community in Detroit,” at conference, “Philosophy and Crisis,” University of Ioannina, Greece, August 2013.

 

“Dorothy Day’s Pursuit of Public Peace Through Word and Action,” Concerned Philosophers for Peace session, American Philosophical Association Eastern Division conference, Atlanta GA, December 2012. Also chaired the second CPP session at the same conference, “Assessing the Philosopher King: Reflections on themes from the book The Liberatory Thought of Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

“Ways of Philosophizing:  Global Challenges,” roundtable panelist, Conference of Philosophical Societies panel at the American Philosophical Association Eastern Division conference, Atlanta GA, December 2012.

 

“Expanding Research Frontiers in African Philosophy,” Roundtable Discussant, African Studies Association conference, “Research Frontiers in the Study of Africa,” Philadelphia PA, November-December 2012.

 

“Revolution and/or Evolution?  Reflections on Grace Lee Boggs’ The Next American Revolution: Sustainable Activism for the Twenty-first Century,” Radical Philosophy Association conference on “What is Radical Philosophy Today?,” Canisius College, Buffalo NY, October 2012.

 

“Carbon Credits Displace Honduran Campesios: An Update on the Honduran Situation,” Peace and Justice Studies Association conference on “Anticipating Climate Disruption: Sustaining Justice, Greening Peace,” Tufts University, October 2012.

 

“Gandhi’s Vow of Nonviolence and the Problem of Unattainable Perfection,” Plenary Address (Invited), Indian Council of Philosophical Research conference “Gandhirama 2012,” Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India, August 2012.

 

“Challenges of Civic Society in Africa:  Philosophical and Novelistic Explorations,” at the North American Society for Social Philosophy’s 29th Annual Social Philosophy conference, entitled “Civic Virtues, Divided Societies, and Democratic Dilemmas,” Northeastern University, Boston MA, July 2012.

 

“Philosopher and Public Intellectual:  Compatible Roles?” Concerned Philosophers for Peace conference, “Peace and the Public Life,” Austin Community College, Texas, Nov. 2011.

 

“Father James ‘Guadalupe’ Carney: An Example of a Man Who is Not Afraid of Challenges,” Peace and Justice Studies Association/ Gandhi-King Conference, Christian Brothers University, Memphis TN, October 2011.

 

Co-organized with Anke Graness a double-session panel on “Henry Odera Oruka:  Sagacious Reasoning,” and presented paper, “Sage Philosophy’s Roots in the Uppsala University and University of Nairobi Contexts,” at the 4th European Conference of African Studies (ECAS), “African Engagements: On Whose Terms?,” Uppsala University, Sweden, June 2011.

 

Presented paper, “Gender Justice and Marriage Practices in Africa” at the International Development Ethics Association (IDEA) conference on Gender Justice and Development: Local and Global, Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania, June 2011.

 

Presented paper, “The Problem of Using Anger as a Motivator for Social Change,” at “Sustainability and Interdependence” conference, Society for Asian and Contemporary Philosophy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, May 2011.

 

Presented paper “Immigration and Education in the United States:  a Challenge to the Values Implicit in Arizona’s Law Against Teaching Ethnic Studies,” at “Value and Values:  Economics and Justice in an Age of Global Interdependence” conference, Tenth East-West Philosophers conference, East-West Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 2011.

 

Presented paper, “Kwame Nkrumah, Positive Action, and the Debate with Fanon on Violence,” at “Violence and Representation in Africa and the African Diaspora,” the 17th Annual International Society for African Philosophy and Studies (ISAPS) conference, Ohio State University, April 2011.

 

Presented paper, “First-person Voice, Present, Absent, or Mediated:  Debates in Biography and Autobiography,” at African Literature Association 37th Annual Conference, Ohio University, April 2011.

 

Co-organized panel (with R. Greg Moses), “Conceptualizing Communication as Intercultural” and presented paper, “Intercultural Communication and the Case of Arizona’s Ban on Ethnic Studies,” at the American Philosophical Association Central Division Program, Minneapolis, MN, April 2011.

 

Roundtable participant, “Planting Pan-African Seeds:  The Life and Legacy of Mzee Bill Sutherland,” African Studies Association conference on “African Diaspora and Diasporas in Africa,” San Francisco CA, November 2010.

 

Presented paper, “Strategic Nonviolence as Expressed in the Manifesto of the Fifth Pan-African Congress in Manchester, England, 1945,” at the Radical Philosophy Association conference, “Violence:  Systemic, Symbolic, and Foundational,” University of Oregon, Eugene OR, November 2010.

 

Organized plenary panel on Kai Kresse’s book, Philosophizing in Mombasa, and presented a paper, “Can Philosophy and Anthropology Combine to Carefully Understand Philosophical Thoughts Cross-Culturally? Reflections on Kai Kresse’s Philosophizing in Mombasa,” International Society for the Oral Literature of Africa conference, Mombasa Kenya, July 2010.

 

Presented paper, “Teaching African Aesthetics in a Philosophy of Art Class,” African Literature Association conference, Tucson, Arizona, March 2010.

 

Presidential Address (Invited), “Gandhian Nonviolence and Pan-Africanism,” Concerned Philosophers for Peace conference, University of Dayton, November 2009.

 

Presented “George Padmore and C.L.R. James on Strategic Nonviolence in the Ghanaian Independence Movement,” Caribbean Philosophical Association conference, University of Miami, August 2009.

 

Presented “Attempts to Create National Culture in Kenya,” European Conference on African Studies, University of Leipzig, June 2009.

 

Presented “Using Oral Literatures, Interviews, and Autobiographies from Africa in Teaching Philosophy of Religion from a Cross-Cultural Perspective” at African Literature Association Conference, Burlington, VT, April 2009.

 

Presented paper, “Are Philosophy and Anthropology Antagonists or Collaborators?: In Favor of an Interdisciplinary Approach,” at African Studies Association conference, Chicago, November 2008.

 

Presented “War is Over/ All You Need is Love: Insights from John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s Campaigns for Peace in 1969.” At Art and Social Transformation Radical Philosophy Association conference, San Francisco State University, November 2008.

 

Presidential Address (Invited), “Gandhi on the Problem of Violence within the Indian Struggle for Independence,” at “Resisting War, Educating for Peace” Concerned Philosophers for Peace conference, SUNY Cortland, November 2008.

 

Panel organizer and participant, “The Importance of Teaching African Philosophy, Including Student Experience of Africa, in African American Studies Programs and/or as Part of a Philosophy-Specific and/or Campus Wide Requirement”  and paper presentation, “I Know How You Feel’:  Challenges of Limited Perspectives When Teaching About Race in a Philosophy Course,” at Philosophy and African American Studies 15th Annual Philosophy Born of Struggle conference, Michigan State University, October 2008.

 

Presented paper, “Overcoming Fear: The Role of Reason and Compassion,” for “Reason, Activism and Change” conference, Canadian Society for Women in Philosophy, University of Windsor, October 2008.

 

Presented “Maintaining Nonviolent Discipline: Examples from Gandhi,” Building Cultures of Peace, Peace and Justice Studies Association conference, Portland State University, September 2008.

 

Presented papers, “Arendt on Propaganda and Truth Telling;” “Secularism and Rationality in Odera Oruka’s Sage Philosophy Project;” Roundtable speaker for “Philosophy Emerging from African Culture” and “Rethinking Globalization from the Position of Multipolarity,” World Congress of Philosophy, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea, July-August 2008.

 

Plenary commentator (Invited) on “Challenges and Opportunities for Philosophy in the Global Interaction of Cultures and Civilizations;” presented paper, “Wise Elders in African and the Tradition-Innovation Tensions Within African Culture,” at the Pre-Conference on Philosophy Emerging from Culture, Council for Research in Values and Philosophy and Soongsil University, Seoul, South Korea, July 2008.

 

Presentation (Power Point), “Teaching about Homelessness in an Introduction to Philosophy Service Learning Class,” Mercy Higher Education “Symposium of Service Learning and Civic Engagement,” Georgian Court University, NJ, June 2008.

 

“Attempts to Create ‘National Culture’ in Kenya,” conference on “Nationalism and Globalization in Conflict and Transition,” Global Studies Association, Pace University, New York, June 2008.

 

“The Logic of the ‘War on Terrorism:’ From Manipulation of Fear to Rational Risk Analysis,” The Human Condition Series Conference on “Terror,” Laurentian University at Georgian College, Barrie, Ontario, Canada, May 2008.

 

“Reflections on Charles W. Mills’ ‘White Ignorance:’ Its Challenge to How We Teach Philosophy on U.S. Campuses.” Conference on “Knowledge, Violence, Discipline: (Re)Thinking Politics and the University,” sponsored by the Philosophy, Interpretation, and Culture program, Binghamton University, April 2008.

 

“Governments That Instill Fear and the Civil Resisters that Resist Fear,” Radical Philosophy Association panel entitled “Leaps of Faith” at American Philosophical Association, Baltimore MD, December 2007. At same conference, respondent for panel on “Contemporary Arab Cultural Critique,” Society for Arab, Persian, and Islamic Philosophy, APA, December 2007.

 

“Assumptions About Fear and Courage, and How These Assumptions are Challenged by Daniel Berrigan, S.J.” Concerned Philosophers for Peace conference, Manchester College, IN, November 2007.

 

“Marriage Practices in East and West Africa: Feminist Critiques, Pro and Con,” African Studies Association Conference, New York City, October 2007.

 

Difficulties Involved in a Project to Create a ‘National Culture’ in Ghana,” Peace and Justice Studies Association conference, Elizabethtown College, PA, September 2007.

 

“Civil Disobedience:  An Expression of Citizenship?”  Citizenship, Identity and Social Justice conference, University of Windsor, May 2007.

 

“Divergent Views of Aurobindo Ghose and Mohandas Gandhi regarding the Use of Terrorism in a Liberation Movement,” American Philosophical Association Central Division, Chicago, April 2007.

 

“Kenyan Sages and Philosophical Counseling,” American Philosophical Association, Eastern Division, Washington D.C., December 2006.

 

Presented keynote address (Invited), “The Language of the Global War on Terror,” for Central New York Peace Studies Consortium conference “The Language of Violence: Thinking Critically about War and Peace,” SUNY Cortland, November 2006.

 

“Scrutinizing Justifications for Increased Surveillance” at Radical Philosophy Association conference, Creighton University, November 2006.

 

Presented keynote address (Invited), “Walking with Gandhi: 100 Years of Satyagraha,” as well as regular session paper, “Gandhi’s Nonviolent Army,” at Concerned Philosophers for Peace conference, St. Bonaventure University, October 2006.

 

“Service Learning and Introductory Philosophy Courses” for Peace and Justice Studies Association conference on “The Common Good” at Manhattan College, October 2006.

 

“Kenyan Sages and the Moral Traditionalist- Innovator Debate,” Caribbean Philosophy Association, Concordia University, Montreal Canada, August 2006.

 

“Gandhi’s Ahimsa, in the Context of Hindu, Jain, and Buddhist concepts.” American Philosophical Association, Central Division, Chicago, Ill., April 2006.

 

“Philosophers at the Global Crossroads: How Can Philosophers Make a Difference?: Concerned Philosophers for Peace,” for panel sponsored by Conference on Philosophical Societies, American Philosophical Association Eastern Division conference, New York City, December 2005.

 

“Grappling With Gandhi’s Ethics of Ahimsa,” American Philosophical Association Eastern Division conference, New York City, December 2005.

 

“Gandhi on Conflict Resolution,” at Concerned Philosophers for Peace conference, California State University–Chico, CA, November 2005.

 

“Gandhi’s Nonviolent Army: Reflections on the Salt March, then and now” at Gandhi Conference, Christian Brothers University, Memphis Tenn., October 2005.

 

“Simone Weil on the Dignity of Labor,” at “Women and Globalization” conference, Institute for Global Justice, San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, July–August 2005.

 

“How Did Gandhi Resolve Conflicts?” at conference “Path to Peace in a World of Violence” sponsored by Gandhian Studies Program, University of Mumbai, Colena Campus, February 2005.

 

“Gandhi’s Ahimsa” at the National conference on the “Role of India in Promoting World Peace,” February 2005, World Peace Center, Maharashtra Institute of Technology, Pune, India.

 

“Is the Iraq War Part of the ‘War on Terror?’” presented at the American Philosophical Association Eastern Division, Boston, Mass., December 2004.

 

“Hannah Arendt on Founding new Government: The Iraq Case,” Radical Philosophy Association conference, Howard University, Washington D.C., November 2004.

 

“Simone Weil on Labor,” Concerned Philosophers for Peace conference, Charlotte N.C., October 2004.

 

“The Success of Political Action in South Africa: Credit to Gandhi or Not?” Gandhi conference, Christian Brothers and Rhodes Universities, Memphis, Tenn., October 2004.

 

“Simone Weil on Labor,” International Philosophers for Peace conference, Radford University, Radford, Va., May 2004.

 

“Hannah Arendt on Founding new Government: The Iraq Case,” Hannah Arendt Circle, Central Division, American Philosophical Association, Chicago, Ill., April 2004.

 

“Sage Philosophy and the Equality of the Sexes,” Philosophy, Interpretation, and Culture conference, Binghamton University, Binghamton, N.Y., April 2004.

 

“Nonviolence in South Africa’s struggle against apartheid,” Social Justice mini-conference, Pacific Division, American Philosophical Association, Pasadena, Calif., March 2004.

 

“Surveillance and benevolence: questions raised by the film “Black River” and “Combat Zones That See” (CTS) technology,” Concerned Philosophers for Peace conference, Pacific University, Forest Grove, Oregon, October 2003.

 

“African Sage Philosophy and Compassion.” Third European Congress of Dialogue and Universalism, Warsaw University, Poland, August 2003.

 

“Response to F. Ochieng’-Odhiambo’s analysis of the philosophy of H. Odera Oruka,” World Congress of Philosophy, Philosophy in Africa session, Istanbul, Turkey, August 2003.

 

“U.S. Foreign Policy and the ideal of a ‘Good Empire’: A Critique.” World Congress of Philosophy, Concerned Philosophers for Peace/ Russian Philosophical Association panel, Istanbul, August 2003.

 

“The Role of Neocolonialism in the U.S. “War on Terror:” Mahmood Mamdani’s Insight into the Current Crisis,” Middle States African Studies Association Conference, theme: “Legacy of Empire: War, Famine, and Poverty in Africa in the Diaspora.” West Virginia State College, Institute, W. Va. May 2003.

 

“H. Odera Oruka on Compassion and Justice,” Philosophy, Interpretation, and Culture Thirteenth Annual conference, Binghamton University, Binghamton, N.Y., April 2003.

 

“Black Hawk Down: Somali and U.S. Perspectives on the “Day of the Rangers,” Africana Studies/ RPA conference, Brown University, Providence, R.I., November 2002.

 

“The Role of Neocolonialism in the U.S. “War on Terror:” Mahmood Mamdani’s Insight into the Current Crisis,” Concerned Philosophers for Peace conference, Walsh University, North Canton Ohio, October 2002.

 

“Belief in Male Superiority among Kenyan Sages: Cultural Determinism, Lack of Moral Imagination, or Self-Deception?” XVIII International Biennial Conference, African Studies Association in Germany (VAD e.V.), University of Hamburg, Germany, May 2002.

 

“Conflict Resolution: Insights of Refugees at Dadaab Refugee Camp, Kenya,” American Philosophical Association, Central Division conference, Chicago, Ill., April 2002. Panel sponsored by the APA Committee for International Cooperation.

 

“Arendt’s Politics of Disinterest: Can They be Applied to the African Context?,” Philosophy, Interpretation and Culture conference, Binghamton University, April 2002.

 

“The Role of Neocolonialism in Shaping Arab Critics of the U.S.: Mahmood Mamdani’s Insight into the Current Crisis,” American Philosophical Association, Pacific Division, Seattle, Wash.., March 2002. Panel sponsored by Concerned Philosophers for Peace.

 

“Political Action and Strategic Nonviolence in Africa,” Concerned Philosophers for Peace conference, St. Bonaventure University, St. Bonaventure, N.Y., October 2001.

 

“Philosophic Sages Debate Ethnicity’s Role in Politics,” at “Ethnicity in an age of globalization” conference, Ugandan Martyr’s University, Kampala, Uganda, September 2001.

 

“Maasai Concepts of Personhood: The Roles of Recognition, Community, and Individuality,” Philosophy, Interpretation and Culture Conference, Binghamton University, Binghamton, N.Y., April 2001.

 

“Hannah Arendt on Love and Justice,” American Philosophical Association, panel sponsored by Gandhi-King Society, New York City, December 2000.

 

“The Struggle for Peace and Justice in Africa,” Loyola University of Chicago, Radical Philosophy Association National Conference, November 2000.

 

“Philosophers on Development: H. Odera Oruka and Segun Gbadegesin.” Sixth Annual International Society for African Studies and Philosophy conference, Nairobi, Kenya, March 2000.

 

“H. Odera Oruka on Compassion,” keynote speaker (Invited) for Fourth Annual H. Odera Oruka Memorial Symposium, Nairobi, Kenya, December 1999.

 

“The Struggle for Recognition in the Philosophy of Axel Honneth applied to the African Renaissance.” Seminar, “The African and European origins of the Renaissance and their contribution to human development,” Goethe Institute, Johannesburg, South Africa, October 1999.

 

“Teaching and Research in African Philosophy.” Spring Lecture Series, University of the North, South Africa, September 1999.

 

“Sage Philosophy and the Issue of Equality of the Sexes.” Quotidian Ethics conference, University of Cape Town, South Africa, August 1999.

 

“Sages Debate Ethnicity and Politics in Kenya.” Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa, Racism and Multiculturalism Conference. June 1999.

 

“Sage Philosophy and Critical Thinking: Creatively Coping with Witchcraft and Jealousy.” Loyola University, Chicago, International Society for African Philosophy and Studies, 5th annual conference, March 1999.

 

“African Politics from the Political Angle of Hannah Arendt.” Conference on “German and African Philosophies of Communities in Transition.” Goethe Institute, Johannesburg, South Africa, October 1998.

 

“H. Odera Oruka on Moral Reasoning and Projecting Future Consequences: Roots in East African Prophetic Tradition.” University of the North, South Africa, Spring Lecture Series on the “African Renaissance,” September 1998.

 

“Who Counts as a Sage? Problems in the Further Implementation of Sage Philosophy.” World Congress of Philosophy, Boston, Mass., August 1998.

 

“H. Odera Oruka on Moral Reasoning and Projecting Future Consequences: Roots in East African Prophetic Tradition.” At Northeastern University, Boston, Mass., in conjunction with the World Congress of Philosophy, Boston MA, panel sponsored by International Philosophers for the Prevention of Nuclear and Other Disasters, August 1998.

 

“Culture, Identity, and Development: The Case of the Maasai,” at the International Social Philosophy conference, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, North Adams, Mass., August 1998.

 

“Should Women Love ‘Wisdom’? Evaluating the Ethiopian Wisdom Tradition,” SOFPHIA (Socialist Feminist Philosophers), City University of New York Graduate Center, May 1998.

 

“Are Akan Chiefs and Queen Mothers in Contemporary Ghana Examples of Democracy? An Evaluation of Wiredu and Gyekye.” New York State African Studies Association, Binghamton University, April 1998.

 

“Hannah Arendt and Frantz Fanon on the Question of Violence.” At Philosophy, Interpretation, and Culture conference, Binghamton University, April 1998.

 

“Contemporary African Sages and Queen Mothers,” Cultural Diversity conference, Northern Colorado State University, Greely, Colo., April 1998.

 

“H. Odera Oruka

on Moral Reasoning and Projecting Future Consequences: Roots in East African Prophetic Tradition.” At American Philosophical Association, Pacific Division, main program, Berkeley, California, March 1998.

 

“Teaching African Philosophy.” At American Philosophical Association conference, Eastern Division, Philadelphia, Penn., December 1997. Panel sponsored by the American Association of Philosophy Teachers.

 

“Are Akan Chiefs and Queen Mothers in Contemporary Ghana Examples of Democracy? An Evaluation of Wiredu and Gyekye,” Society for Philosophy in the Contemporary World, Estes Park, Colo., August 1997.

 

“Criticisms of Multiparty systems: Parallels regarding Political Action in the Works of Hannah Arendt and Ernest Wamba-dia-Wamba,” North American Society for Social Philosophy, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, July 1997.

 

“Should Women Love ‘Wisdom?’ A look at the Ethiopian Wisdom Tradition.” Women and Society Conference, Marist College, Poughkeepsie, N.Y., June 1997.

 

“The Wisdom of African Sages,” at “International Philosophy Conference: Metaphysics, Knowledge and Value,” Hunter College, New York, May 1997. Also, panel participant in “Symposium on Methodology in Africana Philosophy,” presented critical review of D.A. Masolo’s African Philosophy in Search of Identity.

 

“Who Counts as a Sage? Problems in the Further Implementation of Sage Philosophy,” International Society for African and African Diaspora Philosophy and Studies Conference in honor of H. Odera Oruka, University of the North, Pietersburg, South Africa, March 1997.

 

“‘Broad” and “Strict’ Distinctions in Claude Sumner’s Works in Ethiopian and African Philosophy.” Also, Chair for “Sage Philosophy,” and “the Relevance of Language in African Thought” sessions. Pan-African Symposium on “Problematics of an African Philosophy: Twenty Years After (1976-1996).” Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, December 1996.

 

“Should Women Love ‘Wisdom’? Looking at the Ethiopian Wisdom Tradition,” at “Multicultural Dimensions of Ancient and Medieval Thought” conference, Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy and the Institute for Global Cultural Studies, Binghamton University, Binghamton, N.Y., October 1996.

 

“Kenyan Sages and Socrates: Parallels and Contrasts,” at Jacobsen Philosophy Conference, University of Zimbabwe, Harare, 29 February-3 March, 1996.

 

“The Colonialist Goal of a Docile Labor Force in Africa: Its Implications for Development,” at “The Prosperity of Africa,” Third Annual Symposium of the Baha’i Study Association, Nairobi Kenya, November 1995.

 

“Development and Culture” at World Futures Studies Association conference on African Futures Beyond Poverty, Kenyan National Museum, Nairobi, July 1995.

 

“Arendt and Weil on the Status of Labor” at Women and Society Conference, Marist College, Poughkeepsie, N.Y., June 1995.

 

Commentator upon a book, Bad Faith and Antiblack Racism by Lewis Gordon, panel/roundtable at SOFPHIA conference (Socialist Feminist Philosophers), University of Massachusetts–Amherst, May 1995.

 

“Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation: An Appraisal,” at “Fanon Today: Rereadings, Confrontations, Engagements,” Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind., March 1995.

 

“Socrates and Sage Philosophy: Midwifery and Method,” at “Global and Multicultural Dimensions of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy,” Institute for Global Cultural Studies and the Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, N.Y., October 1994. DOI: 10.5840/ipq20024223

 

“African Philosophy and Sage Philosophy,” at “Philosophy and Cultural Diversity” conference, Society for Philosophy in the Contemporary World, Estes Park, Colo., August 1994.

 

Discussant in workshop on “African Philosophy” with Kibujjo Kalumba of Ball State University, at American Association of Philosophy Teachers’ conference, McGill University and Marianapolis College, Montreal, Canada, August 1994.

 

Commentator on paper by Tom Wartenburg, “En-racing Class: Spike Lee’s ‘Jungle Fever.’” Sofphia conference, Holy Cross College, Worcester, Mass, May 1994.

 

“Arendt’s Critique of Frantz Fanon on the Use of Violence by the Oppressed,” Institute for Global Cultural Studies conference, Binghamton University, Binghamton, N.Y., October 1993.

 

“The Armed Forces Caught in a Web: Both Victims and Perpetrators of Violence,” Concerned Philosophers for Peace, Hamline University and Macalester College, Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minn., October 1993.

 

Plenary speaker, “Participatory Democracy: Its Role in Workers’ Self-Management,” at “The Future of Socialism,” Academy of Labor, Moscow, Russia, June 1993.

 

“Social Freedom Contrasted to Individual Freedom and Social Determinism,” at “Social and Economic Aspects of Democratization of Contemporary Society” conference, Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia, June 1993.

 

“Hannah Arendt on Political Action and Revolution,” Eastern Pennsylvania Philosophical Association, University of Scranton, Penn. May 1993.

 

“Hannah Arendt on the Distinction Between Power and Domination,” Concerned Philosophers for Peace, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, October 1992.

 

“Hannah Arendt on Women in Politics,” Women and Society Conference, Marist College, Poughkeepsie, N.Y., June 1992.

 

“Hannah Arendt on Nonviolence and Political Action,” at Nonviolence: Social and Psychological Issues conference, SUNY Institute of Technology at Utica/Rome, N.Y., May 1992.

 

Participated in panel discussion: “Enlarging the Spheres: Women and the Public/Private Distinction,” New York State Political Science Association, Buffalo, N.Y., April 1992.

 

“Hannah Arendt on the Nuclear Arms Race,” Radical Philosophy Association conference on “Technology,” Brecht Forum, New York City, November 1989.

 

 

 

Invited Guest Lecturer

 

Invited panel participant, “Theories of (Non)Violent Revolution: Black liberation,” with Anthony Neal. Oxford Public Philosophy, invited by People for Womxn* in Philosophy and Oxford PPE Society, Susmita Dave and Emma Weitzmann. Recorded Feb. 18, 2021, Posted on March 2, 2021. Online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jntAtmnlno4

 

Presented a paper/ power point presentation, “How Gandhi drew inspiration and learned nonviolent resistance techniques from women,” a webinar organized at the instance of the Ministry of Education, Govt. of India, Visva-Bharati Central University, Santiniketan, India, on 30 August 2020 at 5.30pm (IST) via Zoom.  Part 1: My talk begins around 1 hr 29 mins into the video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HsOu6y-ojQQ  Part 2: Q and A session, begins about 45 mins into the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrn5aZViYBw&feature=youtu.be

 

Invited lectures for the Acorn Symposium, Philosophy Dialogue Series, Texas State University (San Marcos), “How Black Lives Mattered to Gandhi” and “Women’s Nonviolent Activism in South Africa,” February and March, 2018.

 

Invited lecture, “Sages, Proverbs, Myths and Philosophy: Recording the Breadth of Sagacious Wisdom,” and Invited Presenter, “Interviewing Women Sages,” for “Revisiting Sage Philosophy” workshop,  Department of Middle East, South Asian and African Studies, Columbia University, December 2017.

 

Invited presenter, “Interviewing Alice Lakwena: Oral History Methodology,” Wayne State University, November 2017, to Oral History graduate students, invited by Dr. May Seikaly.

 

 

Special Lecture, Third Distinguished Calabar School of Philosophy Scholarly Lecture Series, “Wangari Maathai on Women’s Empowerment,” at the Bassey Andah Institute for African and Asian Studies, University of Calabar, Nigeria, September 2016.

 

Seminar Guest Speaker, “The Philosophical Value of Sages’ Insights: The Views of Odera Oruka and C.S. Momoh,” Department of Philosophy, University of Lagos, Nigeria, September 2016.

 

Public lecture, “Wangari Maathai on Women’s Empowerment and Environmental Activism,” Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma WA, March 2016. Invited by the Department of Philosophy.

 

Public lecture, “Hannah Arendt and Edward Snowden: on Truth and Lying in Politics,” Philosophy department, University of Vienna, May 2015.

 

Guest lecture, “H. Odera Oruka and the Sage Philosophy Project,” for postgraduate course “Sage Philosophy: The Root of African Philosophy and Religion” at the Maryknoll Institute of African Studies of Saint Mary’s University (MIASMU), Tangaza College, Nairobi, Kenya, November 2013.

 

Public lecture, “The Gandhian Philosophy of Nonviolence in African Liberation Movements: Lessons for Our Time,” Philosophical Forum Spring 2013, Frostburg State University, MD, invited by the Philosophy Department, April 2013.

 

Guest lecture, “Nonviolence in the Ghanaian Independence Struggle,” University of California – Berkeley, class on “Gandhi and the Civil Rights Movement,” invited by Dr. Purushottama Bilimoria, March 2013.

 

Public lecture in honor of World Philosophy Day, “Revolution and/or Evolution? Grace Lee Boggs’ Sustainable Activism for Detroit,” University of Windsor Philosophy Department and Philosophical Association of Windsor event held at Phog Lounge, Windsor, November 2012. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NuHi-_n7BAo

 

Public lecture, “Martin Luther King, Jr. on Vietnam: King’s Message Applied to the U.S. Occupation of Iraq and Afghanistan,” University of Kentucky – Lexington, and, discussion, “King Today: On Peace, Community and Democracy,” MLK Cultural Center, University of Kentucky – Lexington, October 2011.

 

Panelist on topic, “Are Religions Inherently Violent?,” Eastern Michigan University, invited by EMU Office of Multicultural Affairs, September 2011.

 

Guest lecturer in class, “Critical Social Thought,” spoke on C.L.R. James, invited by Anatole Anton, San Francisco State University, November 2010.

 

Presented lecture/ power point presentation, “Gandhi’s Salt March:  Contemporary Implications” to Peace and Conflict class, Portland Community College, Sylvania campus, OR, November 2010.

 

Presented paper, “Gandhi on Conflict Resolution,” Conflict Resolution program, Portland State University, Portland OR, November 2010.

 

Presented lecture, Sage Philosophy: Investigating Its Past and Speculating on Its Future,”

University of Nairobi Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, July 2010.

 

Presented three talks, “Fr. James Carney, S.J.: A Man Who is not Afraid of Challenges;” “Dorothy Day on Courage;” “Gandhi and Nonviolence.” Ukrainian Catholic University, Lviv, Ukraine, May 2009.

 

Public talk, “Retracing Gandhi,” Marist Praxis Forum for Public Citizenship, Marist College, Poughkeepsie, NY, April 2008.

 

Public talk, “Professor Henry Odera Oruka of Kenya: An Intellectual History” to the Philosophy Department and Africana Studies Dept., Wayne State University, April 2008.

 

Presented a paper, “Martin Luther King, Jr. on Vietnam:  King’s Message Applied to the U.S. Occupation of Iraq,” Butler University, October 2007.

 

Presented a paper, “Gandhi on Terrorism and Nonviolence,” Michigan State University Philosophy dept., Lansing MI, April 2007.

 

Classroom lecture, “Feminist Issues in African Philosophy” to a class on African Philosophy, Michigan State University, Lansing MI, April 2007.

 

Public talk, “Odera Oruka’s sage philosophy project: recent developments,” Gesellshaft für Afrikanische Philosophie, Afrika Haus, Berlin, Germany, June 2006.

 

“Democratic Philosophy in Akan Chieftancy,” Tamale Institute for Cross Cultural Studies, Tamale, Ghana, June 2006.

 

Presented talk, “Models of Democracy in Africa,” Rochester College, Mich., April 2006.

 

“The Goal of Sage Philosophy,” Philosophy Dept. seminar, Central Florida University, Orlando, Fla., March 2006.

 

“Arendt on Founding New Government: The Iraq Case,” public lecture, San Francisco State University, Calif., November 2005.

 

Presented “Strategic Nonviolence in Africa: reasons for its embrace and later abandonment by Nkrumah, Nyerere, and Kaunda,” African History class, Dr. Heather Hoag, Also presented paper, “Arendt on Founding New Government: The Iraq Case,” Conflict Resolution class, Dr. Stephen Zunes, University of San Francisco, Calif., November 2005.

 

Guest lecture, African Philosophy and the work of H. Odera Oruka, University of Windsor, Ontario, Canada, November 2005.

 

Presented a paper on “Gandhi’s Nonviolent Strategy,” History Department colloquia, University of Mumbai (Bombay), India, June 2005.

 

Presented paper “The Non-Violent Army: Reflections on Gandhi’s Salt March” at Mani Bhavan (Gandhi Museum and Library), Mumbai (Bombay), May 2005.

 

Spoke on panel for Women’s Day, March 8, 2005, World Peace Center, Maharashtra Institute of Technology, Pune, India.

 

“Response to F. Ochieng’-Odhiambo’s analysis of the philosophy of H. Odera Oruka,” Philosophy Dept., George Washington University, Washington D.C. November 2004.

 

Presented “Oruka’s Sage Philosophy: A Feminist Critique,” Ethics Center, University of North Carolina Charlotte, October 2004.

 

“Ethics of Care, Ethics of Justice in the philosophy of H. Odera Oruka.” Philosophy Dept. Symposium series, open to the public, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo., February 2003.

 

“Maasai Culture: The Voices of the Sages,” with Daniel Sasine, Montclair State University, Montclair, N.J., spoke to anthropology students. November 2002.

 

“The Wisdom of African Sages,” presentation with slides, Wayne County Community College, Detroit Mich., April 2001.

 

“Philosophers on Development: H. Odera Oruka and Segun Gbadegesin,” for faculty symposium, Moi University, Eldoret, Kenya, June 2000.

 

Guest lecture series, “The Concept of Development,” for Master’s Degree Program in Development, University of the North, South Africa, February and May 2000.

 

Guest lecture series, “Gender and Communication,” Institute of African Studies, postgraduate program in Gender Studies, University of Nairobi, Kenya, March–April 2000.

 

“Is there an African Philosophy?” Paper presented at Daystar University, Nairobi, Kenya, March 2000.

 

“Hannah Arendt on Political Philosophy and Ideology,” lecture for “Political Ideologies and Political Philosophy” course, University of the North, South Africa, November, 1999.

 

“Sage Philosophy” lecture to two sections of Introduction to Philosophy course; “Philosophy of Religion regarding African Religions” lecture in Philosophy of Religion course, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, May 1999.

 

“The Wisdom of African Sages,” public lecture with slides, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, March 1999.

 

“Philosophy and Critical Thinking: Creatively Coping with Witchcraft and Jealousy.” Invited guest lecturer to Introduction to Philosophy course. Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya, February 1999.

 

“Contemporary African Sages and Queen Mothers: Their Leadership Role in Conflict Resolution,” Third year honors philosophy course, also open to the public. University of the North, South Africa, September 1998.

 

“An Introduction to the Political Philosophy of Hannah Arendt.” John Jay College, City University of New York, April 1998.

 

“Are Akan Chiefs and Queen Mothers in Contemporary Ghana Examples of Democracy? An Evaluation of Wiredu and Gyekye.” Public lecture sponsored by the Philosophy Graduate Program, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo., April 1998.

 

“Should Women Love ‘Wisdom’? Evaluating the Ethiopian Wisdom Tradition,” University of Southern Maine, public lecture sponsored by Philosophy Dept., Portland, Maine, February 1998.

 

“Contemporary African Sages and Queen Mothers: Their Leadership Roles in Conflict Resolution.” Philosophy Dept. Lecture Series, San Francisco State University, Calif., October 1997.

 

“Human Rights: Universal or Culture Specific?” lecture at University of Stellenbosch, South Africa, March 1997.

 

“The Wisdom of African Sages,” paper, Research Unit on African Philosophy, UNISA (University of South Africa), Pretoria, South Africa, March 1997.

 

“Kant’s Ethics and his critics: Hannah Arendt and Carol Gilligan,” lecture, Graduate course on “Logic and Moral Reasoning.” University of Cape Coast, Ghana, May 1996.

 

“P.M. Dikirr’s Study of the Maasai Conception of a Person, Framed in the Larger Menkiti-Gyekye Debate on Philosophy of Person in Africa,” lecture, “African Philosophy” class, Trinity College, Accra, Ghana, May 1996.

 

Lectured for “Social and Political Philosophy” course, on Bentham and Mill’s Utilitarianism. Lectured for “Theories of Justice” course, on John Rawls. Lectured for “Ethics” course on Women’s Rights as Human Rights. Invited by Dr. Joseph Osei of the Philosophy Dept., University of Ghana at Legon, May-July 1996.

 

Sabbatical visit: lectures for Social Philosophy, on major figures; for Philosophy of Religion, on Anselm, Aquinas, Hume, Freud and Feyerbach; for History of Modern Philosophy, on Rationalists and Empiricists. Lectures for “Oriental Philosophy” course, and “Epistemology.” Covered Southeast and South Asia: on Confucius, Mencius, Hsun Tzu; Taoists Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu; the Bhagavad-Gita; the debate between Nagarjuna and the Nyaya School; and Shankara’s Monism. University of Nairobi, Kenya, July 1995–May 1996.

 

“African Sages in Action and Interaction: H. Odera Oruka’s Challenges to the Academic Role of the Philosopher,” paper, public lecture, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia, April 1996.

 

“African Philosophy: From its Beginnings to Contemporary Times.” Lecture, Capuchin Franciscan Institute of Philosophy and Theology. Invited by Dr. Samuel Wolde-Yohannis and Fr. Haile Gabriel. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, April 1996.

 

“African Philosophy: From its Beginnings to Contemporary Times.” Lecture to over 200 Philosophy students. Invited by Mr. Workineh Kelbessa. Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia, April 1996.

 

“Gandhi’s Activism in South Africa, 1893-1914.” Lecture for class, “The History of Africa.” Invited by Dr. Neil McHugh, Fulbright Historian. Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia, April 1996.

 

“The Afrocentric Challenge to Eurocentric Philosophy,” lecture, invited by Joe Ndaba. University of Zululand, South Africa, March 1996.

 

“Critics of Boers or Africans? Arendt’s Treatment of South Africa in Origins of Totalitarianism,” and “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation: A Comparison to Gandhi and Mandela,” seminar papers. Invited by Dr. Joe Teffo (President of the South African Philosophical Association). University of the North, Pietersburg, South Africa, March 1996.

 

“On a Mission to Morally Improve One’s Society: Odera Oruka’s African Sages and the Socratic Paradigm,” paper. Invited by Dr. Kosie Abrahams. University of the Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa, February 1996.

 

“Critics of Boers or Africans? Arendt’s Treatment of South Africa in Origins of Totalitarianism,” paper. Invited by Wilhelm Verwoerd. Participated in a two-day seminar for Master’s Philosophy students on Applied Ethics. University of Stellenbosch, South Africa, February 1996.

 

“From Khoikhoi Herdsmen to Maasai Pastoralists: Colonial and Post-Colonial Attempts to Change Labor into Wage Labor,” lecture, Anthropology students. Invited by Dr. N.S. Jansen van Rensburg. Potchef­stroom University, South Africa, February 1996.

 

“Ways in Which Oral Philosophy is Superior to Written Philosophy: A Look at Odera Oruka’s Rural Sages,” paper, Research Unit on African Philosophy. Invited by Dr. M.E.S. van den Berg. UNISA (University of South Africa), Pretoria, South Africa, February 1996.

 

“Social and Political Philosophy,” taught by Dr. E. Beyar­aaza, taught two classes on Hannah Arendt’s criticisms of the political philosophies of Plato and Aristotle. For “Ethics,” taught by Prof. A. Dalfovo, gave a lecture on “African Ethics.” For a graduate course in “Research Methodology,” taught by Prof. Dalfovo, presented a lecture on Prof. H. Odera Oruka’s Sage Philosophy Method, and the surrounding controversy. For A. Byaruhanga’s class on “The History of Philosophy,” gave a lecture on Aristotle’s Ethics and Politics. For Dr. J. Kigongo’s class on “Introduction to Philosophy,” lectured on “The Problem of Eurocentric Perspective in Philosophy.” Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, January 1996.

 

“Gender and Morality” graduate course, Wafula Jackson, prof. Three topics: “The Origins of Gender Inequality,” October 1995; “Alternatives to Gender Inequality,” November 1995; and “Gender Equality in Africa,” Catholic University of East Africa, Nairobi, Kenya, December 1995.

 

“Fanon and Gandhi: The Use of Medical Metaphors in Describing Political Action,” lecture,” African Social and Political Thought” course, Dr. Maria Kente, Prof., University of Dar Es Saalam, Tanzania, December 1995.

 

“Marx and Gandhi on Political Action,” lecture, “Comparative Philosophy” course, Wafula Jackson, Prof., United States International University, Nairobi, Kenya. December 1995.

 

“The Multiculturalist Challenge to Eurocentrism in the Field of Philosophy,” lecture, “Pluralism and Diversity” course, Dr. Larry Riddick, Prof. Rockland Community College, State University of New York, Monsey, November, 1994.

 

“Hannah Arendt’s Political Philosophy,” lecture, “Wo­men and the Revolution” course, Summer Scholars Program, Anna Brown, prof. Lehman College, City University of New York, Bronx, July 1994.

 

“African Philosophy and Sage Philosophy,” paper, Long Island University, C.W. Post Campus, Brookville, N.Y., April 1994.

 

“Nonviolence and Political Action in the Thought of Hannah Arendt,” paper, University of Nairobi, Kenya, July 1993.

 

 

 

Community/Non-academic Speaking Engagements

 

Presented a talk (via Zoom) “Historical Background for the Causes of Central American Migration,” for Our Mother of Perpetual Help and Christ Our Light Parishes, MI, July, 2020.

 

Presented a talk (via Zoom) on “The History of U.S. Policy with Central America” for a program, “The Immigration Crisis and our Faith,” sponsored by Alianza Americas, Strangers No Longer – Michigan and CLASA, June 2020. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KWbF-j63Kmo

 

Presented a talk on “The Cultural, Social and Economic Causes of Central American Migration” to parishioners at Saint’s John & Paul’s Parish, Washington, MI, September 2019.

 

Presented a workshop and power point on understanding justice issues in Central America, at the National Jesuit Student Leadership conference, University of Detroit Mercy, July  2019.

 

Presentation on our Human Rights delegation to Honduras, Pax Christi Marygrove, Marygrove College, June 2018.

 

Presentation, “Brazilian Social Movements,” Center for Global Justice, San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Mexico, August 2017.

 

Presentation, “Gandhi and the South African Women of Nonviolence,” for Citizens for Peace, Unity of Livonia, May 2017.

 

Four presentations for Pax Christi Michigan retreat, “Reflections and Renewal for the Long Haul: Conversations with Gail Presbey,” on the topic of women activists for peace and justice. Ralph MacMullan conference center, Higgins Lake, MI, October 2015.

 

Week-long course on African History, six sessions, July 6-11, 2015, Great Huts, Port Antonio, Jamaica. Find radio interview about the course with “Sista P” (Pauline Petinaud) of “Spiritual Vibrations” show, STYLESFM radio, July 9, 2015, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-jZckUvDBI

 

“Do You Speak Derrida?” – invited as one of four panelists for roundtable discussion at North End Studios, Detroit, MI, August 2012.

 

“Reflections on Experiences of the SOA Watch Delegation to Honduras,” Bishop Gumbleton Pax Christi group, St. Leo’s Parish, Detroit MI, August 2011.

 

“Standing in Solidarity with the Teachers of Honduras:  A Report from the SOA Watch Delegation to Honduras,” United Auto Workers Solidarity House, Detroit MI, June 2011.

 

“Insights from Dorothy Day and Mother Maria Skobtsova,” Bishop Gumbleton Pax Christi, St. Leo’s Parish, Detroit MI, June 2009.

 

“Somalia and the War on Terrorism,” luncheon discussion, Center for the Modern Orient, Berlin, June 2009.

 

“Walking in the Footsteps of Gandhi,” workshop at Pax Christi Michigan annual conference, Marygrove College, April 2009.

 

“Torture and the War on Terrorism,” Oakland Pax Christi meeting, Sylvan Lake MI, April 2008.

 

“The Wisdom of Kenyan Sages,” talk to senior citizens at Hannan House, Detroit, Mich., February 2008.

 

Gave talk on the experience of walking 100 Miles on the Salt March 2005 (75th anniversary of the march of 1930) to students attending Gandhi Summer Camp, at the Gandhi Memorial, Aga Khan Palace, Pune, India, 17 April 2005.

 

“Catholic Approaches to Peace and Justice,” St. Blase Church, Sterling Heights, Mich., February 2004.

 

Keynote Address, 40th anniversary of Kenya’s independence, Kenyan Students and Nationals of Michigan, Livonia MI, November 2003.

 

“St. Therese of Liseux,” St. Mary Queen of Creation parish, New Baltimore, Mich., November 2003.

 

“Black Hawk Down: What the Film Won’t Tell You,” Green House, Ferndale, Mich., May 2002.

 

“The Wisdom of African Sages,” Keynote Address, Poughkeepsie High School Honor Society Induction Ceremony, Poughkeepsie, N.Y., May 1998.

 

“Arendt and Weil: Divergent Views of Labor” at the Catholic Worker, New York City, May 1998.

 

“The Wisdom of African Sages,” paper, Ubuntu School of Philosophy public gathering in Mellville, Johannesburg, South Africa, March 1997.

 

“The Wisdom of African Elders,” lecture, Catholic Worker Friday Night Lecture Series, New York City, January 1997.

 

Keynote Speaker, “A Philosophical Perspective on Culturally-Sensitive Development.” Workshop on the “Reconstruction and Development Programme,” sponsored by the Ubuntu School of Philosophy. Johannesburg, South Africa, February 1996.

 

“Hannah Arendt on Nonviolence and Revolution.” Friday Night Lecture Series, The Catholic Worker, New York City, May 1992.

 

“Conflict Resolution,” sermon, at Manhattan Mennonite Fellowship, New York, January 1992.

 

“Hannah Arendt on Political Action.” Friday Night Lecture Series, The Catholic Worker, New York City, February, 1988.

 

GUEST SPEAKING IVITATIONS AT UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT MERCY

 

Presentation to participants in the Fulbright Brazil Educators’ group, on “Women/Gender in Brazil,” invited by Lara Wasner and Ann Eskridge, June 2018.

Presentation to “Women and Folklore” class, invited by Ann Eskridge, on Amuesha Folktales, Feb. 2018.

 

Public presentation, “The role of the British suffragettes in inspiring women’s nonviolent protest in South Africa, 1907-1913,” invited by the Women’s and Gender Studies Program of University of Detroit Mercy, November 2017.

 

Guest speaker, “What I learned about Afro-Brazilian history and culture: Reflections on U.S. – Brazil experiences of discrimination and police violence,” for Introduction to Sociology class, University of Detroit Mercy, November 2017, invited by Dr. Chaunda Scott.

Two guest lectures for Comparative Civilizations (Dr. Diane Robinson-Dunn). On Pontecorvo’s film, Battle of Algiers, No. 2017; on Mayan History, Art, Religion and Philosophy, September 2017.

Presentation on Filhos de Gandhy (the Samba Society in Salvador, Bahia), for a panel on Brazil at Faculty Development Days, University of Detroit Mercy, August 2016.

Guest lecture, “Women, Slavery and Resistance in Cuba and Brazil,” University of Detroit Mercy, History department course on “Women, Slavery and Resistance,” invited by Prof. Roy Finkenbine, December 2015.

Two guest lectures, “The History of Slavery and its Abolition in Cuba,” and “Women in Cuba,” for University of Detroit Mercy course, “Spanish/ Latin American Culture,” in Cuba, May 2015.

 

 

University Philosophy Courses Taught, with some Religious Studies and History courses (and number of times taught if more than once)

Over thirty years of experience, 1983–2015

 

(Post-)Graduate Courses:

University of Nairobi:

Ethics and Social Philosophy (2); African Philosophy (2)

University of Detroit Mercy, Master’s of Arts in Liberal Studies Degree Program:

Seminar in the History of Ideas, a special topics course, offered on the graduate level in different semesters focusing on: African Philosophy (W2014); Peace and Social Justice (F2012); Advanced Topics in Philosophy:  Terrorism  (F2009)

 

Undergraduate Courses

Social and Political Philosophy and Related Topics:

Peace and Social Justice (8); Social and Political Philosophy (4); Special Topics: Revolution, Violent or Nonviolent? (2); Philosophy of Nonviolence; Religion and Social Concerns (2); Catholic Approaches to Peace and Justice; Philosophy of Feminism (3); Special Topics: Democracy or Authoritarianism?; Catholic Social Thought; Topics in Philosophy: Terrorism (2); Latin American Liberation Theology.

 

Ethics and Related Topics:

Introduction to Ethics (over 25 times); Business Ethics; Religion and Sexual Morality; Social Ethics

 

Non-Western or Multicultural Philosophy

African Philosophy (6); Comparative Philosophy (2); World Views and Values; Special Topics: Spiritual Autobiographies; Special Topics: International Film and Cultural Studies; Latino/a History and Philosophy.

 

Other – Philosophy:

Introduction to Philosophy (more than 25); Theory of Knowledge (5); Philosophy of Education (4); Introduction to Metaphysics (2); Philosophy of History; Philosophy of Religion (3);

The Human Person; Aesthetics (4); Classical Philosophy; Medieval Philosophy and Theology; Contemporary Philosophy (2).

 

Other teaching – outside of Philosophy (and Religious Studies):

Politics in Africa (2); History of Modern Africa (2); Postgraduate course, Seminar in the History of Ideas – Politics in Africa; History of Modern Latin America (2);

 

Doctoral Thesis Supervision or Official Reader:

Murilo Seabra, “Reinventing Philosophy in Brazil: Epistemic Justice and Cognitive Bias in Brazilian Academic Philosophy.” LaTrobe University, Australia. External examiner. Report submitted July 2018.

 

Oritsegbubemi Anthony Oyowe, (University of KwaZulu-Natal), External examiner,  PhD thesis, “Personhood and Human Rights:  A Critical Study of the African Communitarian and Normative Conception of Self,” 2013.

 

Master’s Thesis Supervision or Official Reader:

 

  1. C. Mokobane (University of the North, South Africa), External Examiner, MA thesis, “Freedom from Colonialism: Critical Reflections on Fanon,” 2001.

 

Joseph Kamau (University of Nairobi), Supervisor, MA thesis, “Environmental Exploitation and the Obligation to Future Generations,” 2000.

 

C.I. Okello, (University of Nairobi), Supervisor, M.A. Thesis, “Marxism as Feminism: A philosophical Examination of Marxist theory in search for Gender Equality,” 2000.

 

M.A. Utwolo (University of Nairobi), Supervisor, “The Ethical Principles Regarding the Practice of Capital Punishment in Africa,” 2000.

 

James Kimani Kimuhu (University of Nairobi), Supervisor, MA thesis, “An Inquiry into the Philosophical Reasons for the Socio-Cultural Factor in Development,” 1999.

 

Grace Bosiboi Ezekiel, (University of Nairobi), Reader, MA thesis, “Popular Religion: A Study of Some Lunch Hour Religious Assemblies in Nairobi,” 1995.

 

 

Graduate Courses Taken for credit toward a Graduate Certificate in World History (Wayne State University):

Winter 2015: HIS 8310 Seminar in World History (Jennifer Hart), WSU, A; HIS 7990 Directed Study, Cuba (Jorge Chinea), WSU, A; HIS 478 Latin America: National Period (Sueann Caulfield), U of Michigan, A+.

Summer 2015: HIS 5234 Race and Colonial Latin America (José Cuello), WSU, A.

Fall 2015: HIS 6000, Oral History and the Middle East (May Seikaly), WSU, A.

Fall 2016: HIS 6000, War and Society in Central Africa (Osumaka Likaka), WSU, A;

HIS 7999 (Directed Study), Latinos in the U.S. (Jorge Chinea), WSU, A.

 

 

Positions Held in Professional Organizations:

 

2018-present, Secretary, Peace History Society.

2017-present, Board of Directors, Peace History Society.

2015 –2017, Program Committee for the African Studies Association conference (Philosophy theme Co-Chair), San Diego (2015), Washington D.C. (2016), Chicago (2017) and Boston (2019).

2012- 2014: Board of Directors, Peace and Justice Studies Association (elected), Liaison to Activists

2007–present: Advisory Board, Marquette University Center for Peacemaking.

2010-2012: Past-President and Executive Committee member, Concerned Philosophers for Peace.

2008-2010: Elected President of Concerned Philosophers for Peace.

2008:  Selection Committee for Peace and Justice Studies Association conference, “Building             Cultures of Peace,” Portland State University, September 2008.

2007: External Evaluator for Master’s Degree Program in Philosophy, Addis Ababa University.

2002–2008: Elected as Executive Director of Concerned Philosophers for Peace for a three year term; reconfirmed for an additional three years.

2000–2003: Treasurer, International Society for African Philosophy and Studies.

1999–2002: Served a three-year term, nominated and elected, on the Committee for International Cooperation, American Philosophical Association.

1999–2000: Key organizer of international conference, “Thought and Practice in African Philosophy,” held at University of Nairobi, March 2000, including thirty-eight presenters from three continents.

 

Editor/Reviewer of books, articles, and Fellowship applications

2016-present:  Associate Editor, Acorn: Philosophical Discussions in Pacifism and Nonviolence

2016-present: During this time I have been a blind reviewer for Sophia: International Journal for Philosophy of Religion, Metaphysical Theology and Ethics; Hypatia; Journal of International Political Theory; Budhi:A Journal of Ideas and Culture; Bloomsbury; Dialogue: Canadian Philosophical Review.

2013 – present Reviewer for books in Cultural Heritage and Contemporary Change series, Council for Research in Values and Philosophy, Catholic University of America.

2013 – 2016:    Reviewer for University of Notre Dame Press.

2010-16:          During this time period I was blind reviewer for Critical Philosophy of Race,  Hypatia, Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Journal for Peace and Justice Studies, Journal of International Political Theory, Journal of Philosophical Research, Philosophical Papers, Radical Philosophy Review,  South African Journal of Philosophy, Studies in Social Justice, Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya, and University of California Press (listed alphabetically).

2011, 12, 13:   Reviewer of fellowship applications for J. William Fulbright Scholar Program.

2009- 2013:     Reviewer, Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowships Program (reviewed Doctoral, Dissertation and Post-Doctoral Fellowship applications).

2012-present:  Advisory Board of Gender Questions, UNISA (South Africa).

2009-7/2011:  Africa Series II Editor, Council for Research in Values and Philosophy, Catholic University of America.

2009:               Reviewer, SUNY Press

2008-present:              Associate Editor (and Blind Reviewer), Philosophia Africana

2004-09:          During this time period I was blind reviewer for Afrika Spectrum, Ejossah:  Ethiopian Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities,  Journal for Peace and Justice Studies, New Political Science,  Radical Philosophy Today, Social Theory and Practice,  Theoria, and  Transformations: The Journal of Inclusive Scholarship and Pedagogy (listed alphabetically).

2005–2016: Editorial Board (& Blind Reviewer), Acorn: Journal of the Gandhi King Society 2005:           Reviewer, Humanity Books

2000–present: Editorial board of Polylog: Forum für interkulturelles Philosophieren.

2000–present: Blind reviewer, Philosophy of Peace/Value Inquiry Book Series, Rodopi

1993-2003:      During this time period I was blind Reviewer for African Philosophy (now Philosophia Africana), Hypatia, Philosophy and Geography, Social Philosophy Today series (North American Society for Social Philosophy, Edwin Mellen Press), listed alphabetically.

 

Service on Faculty Committees, University and College Level

 

University of Detroit Mercy:

 

2020-present, Co-Chair, Great Lakes Bioneers Detroit conference.

2019-present, African American Studies Program Advisory Committee

2019-present, University of Detroit Mercy Professors Union Board Member.

2018-present, College of Liberal Arts and Education Tenure and Promotion Committee.

2019: Great Lakes Bioneers Detroit Conference Planning Committee (in charge of sponsors and exhibitors).

2011-17: Chair, Ad-hoc committee to form a Global Studies Program (appointed).

2016-17: University of Detroit Mercy Professor’s Union Membership Engagement Committee.

2013-14: University of Detroit Mercy Professor’s Union Crisis Committee.

2012-2013: Promotion and Tenure Task Force (elected).

2011-2012: CLAE Ad-hoc Committee on Academic Integrity (appointed).

2010-2012: Mission, Urban and Social Justice Team (elected).

2008-2010: Mission, Urban and Social Justice Team (appointed).

2006–2011: African American Studies Steering Committee (appointed).

2007-08: University of Detroit Mercy Professor’s Union, Negotiating Committee.

2005–2006: McNichols Faculty Assembly (elected position)

2005–2006: Urban/Service/Social Justice Team, Vice-Chair, MFA liason (elected position)

2005–2006: College Tenure and Promotion Committee (elected position)

2000–2006: Academic Committee on the Status of Women (appointed); Co-chair, 2001–2006 (elected)

2000-2003: Honorary Degree Committee (appointed).

 

Marist College:

 

1996–1998: Chair of Sabbaticals and Research Grants Committee

1995–1998: Marist Praxis Project Associated Faculty

1997:   Philosophy Dept. Tenure-Track position search committee

1995:   Dean of Humanities Search/ Hiring Committee

1995:   Philosophy Dept. Term Contract Hiring Committee

1994–1995: Library Committee

1994:   CORE Curriculum Committee on Human Rights and Responsibilities

1993–1994: Faculty Hospitality and Social Action Committee

1993:   Religious Studies Tenure Track Hiring Committee

1991–1993: Editorial Committee, Marist Working Papers

 

Professional Memberships

 

American Philosophical Association

Concerned Philosophers for Peace

International Society for African Philosophy and Studies

Peace and Justice Studies Association

Radical Philosophy Association

Peace History Society

World History Association

Society of Intercultural Philosophy (Germany)

Philosophical Association of Kenya

African Studies Association

Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy

Global Studies Association

 

 

 

Citations: Authors who cite my research, with cited source listed. This is a partial list; these are only the citations I have looked up myself. In gratitude for the ways in which we can draw upon and build upon each other’s work, as we exchange ideas. H-index of 11 on Google Scholar.

 

Citations in Books, book chapters and journal articles:

 

  1. Lawrence, David Peter and Eddah Mbula Mutua, “Dialogs and Solidarity Among the Sages: Bimal Krishna Matilal and Henry Odera Oruka’s Advocacy for the Philosophical Rationality of Non-Western Cultures,” Journal of Dharma Studies, 2 (2020), 153-162, on pages 159, 162 cites “Ways in Which Oral Philosophy,” 1996.
  2. Neequaye G.K. (2020) “Personhood in Africa,” in: Wariboko N., Falola T. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of African Social Ethics, Palgrave Macmillan, cites “Maasai Concepts of Personhood,” 2002. Part of DOI: 10.1057/978-1-137-59291-0_6
  3. Anakweze, Peter Ugochukwu, “Ogbunu Youth Crisis and Transformative Pacifism: A Panacea for Intra-Group Conflict in Awka, Anambra State,” IGWEBUIKE: An African Journal of Arts and Humanities, 6/1 (2020), 84-104, on pages 101, 104 cites “Philosophy of Nonviolence in Africa,” 2017.
  4. Motsamai, Molefe. African Personhood and Applied Ethics, African Humanities Series: NiSC/AHP, 2020, on pages 4, 129, 137 cites “Maasai Concepts of Personhood,” 2002.
  5. Chiramel, Paul Jose, “Greek Oedipus’s Story and the Ethiopian Skendes’s story,” Ars Artium: An International … Research Journal of English Studies and Culture, vol. 8 (Jan. 2020), 40-48, cites “Should Women Love Wisdom?,” 2003.
  6. Motsamai, Molefe. “Solving the Conundrum of African Philosophy Through Personhood: The Individual or Community?” Journal of Value Inquiry 54/1 (Mar 2020): 41-57. DOI:10.1007/s10790-019-09683-8, in ft. 41 cites “Maasai Concepts of Personhood,” 2002.
  7. Adejumo-Ayibiowu, Oluwakemi Damola, “Democracy, Decentralization, and Rural Development in Africa: Learning from Within” (ch. 2) and “Good Governance and Rural Development in Africa: Finding the Missing Link” (ch.4) in Mavhungu Abel Mafukata and Khathutshelo Alfred Tshikolomo (Eds.), African Perspectives on Reshaping Rural Development, IGI Global Publishers, 2020, pages 67-93, on pages 36, 45, 91, 384, 385 cites “African Philosophers on Global Wealth Distribution,” 2002.
  8. Visana, Vikram. “Beyond citizen and subject: New perspectives on political thought, ‘tribe,’ and ‘indirect rule’ in Africa,” History Compass, 2019, DOI: 10.1111/hic3.12525, pp. 7, 11, cites “Gandhi’s Many Influences and Collaborators.”
  9. Gutema, Bekele, “Claude Sumner’s ‘Oromo Wisdom Literature’: An Attempt at Understanding their Philosophical Content,” in Ethiopian Journal of the Social Sciences and Humanities (EJOSSAH) 15/1 Special issue (2019), 25-40, on pages 34 and 40 cites “Sage Philosophy: Criteria that Distinguish it from Ethnophilosophy,” 2007.
  10. Pilpel, Avital and Shahar Gindi (2019): African and Islamic philosophy: Expanding the horizons of philosophical counselling, European Journal of Psychotherapy & Counselling, on pages 7, 15, cites “African Sage Philosophy and Socrates,” 2002.
  11. Temin, David Myer, “’Nothing much had happened’: Settler colonialism in Hannah Arendt,” in European Journal of Political Theory, Article First (online), 2019, 1–25, on pages 3, 17, 24, cites “Critics of Boers or Africans? Arendt’s Treatment of South Africa”, 1997.
  12. Ambrose, Don, (2019). “Giftedness and wisdom,” in R. J. Sternberg & J. Glück (Eds.), The Cambridge handbook of wisdom, Cambridge University Press, 465–482, cites “Hannah Arendt on Power,” 1997.
  13. Mutlu-Numansen, Sofia and Marinus Ossewaarde, “A Struggle for Genocide Recognition: How the Aramean, Assyrian, and Chaldean Diasporas Link Past and Present,” Holocaust and Genocide Studies 33/3 (Winter 2019), 412–428, on pages 414, 415, 427 cites “The Struggle for Recognition in the Philosophy of Axel Honneth,” 2003.
  14. Halmosi, Péter, “Detroit város 2013-as csődesetének tanulságai (Lessons from Detroit City Government’s bankruptcy of 2013,” Köz-gazdaság-Review of Economic Theory and Policy, 2018, 269-281, on pages 273, 281 cites “Globalization and the Crisis in Detroit,” 2015.
  15. Molefe, Motsame, (2019) An African Philosophy of Personhood, Morality, and Politics. Palgrave Macmillan, on pages 5, 15, cites “Maasai Concepts of Personhood,” 2002.
  16. Fiala, Andrew. “The Pacifist Tradition and Pacifism as Transformative and Critical Theory,” in The Acorn: Philosophical Studies in Pacifism and Nonviolence, Vol 18, Nos. 1–2, Spring/Fall 2018, cites “Philosophy of Nonviolence in Africa,” 2017.
  17. Adom, Dickson, Eric Appau Asante, Steve Kquofi, and Nana Ama Pokuaa Arthur, The Conservation Ethos in the Asante Cultural and Artistic Elements for the Management of Ghana’s Biodiversity,” International Journal of Humanities and Social Science Review l. 4/3, April 2018, on pp. 2, 22 cites ‘H. Odera Oruka on Moral Reasoning,” 2000.
  18. Beck, Simon and Oritsegbubemi Oyowe (2018), “Who Gets a Place in Person-Space?,” Philosophical Papers, 47:2, 183-198, DOI: 10.1080/05568641.2017.1421868 cites “Maasai Concepts of Personhood,” 2002.
  19. Nagel, Methchild, Ubuntu, Gender and Spirituality: Transformative Justice Considerations,”

in Kalgatos Revista de Filosofia 15/2 (May-Aug 2018), 56-70, on p. 69 cites “Who counts as a Sage?, 1998.

  1. Brooks, Melanie C. “Grassroots Leadership for Ecological Sustainability, Empowerment, and Political Change: Wangari Maathai and the Green Belt Movement,” in Jeffrey S. Brooks and Anthony H. Normore (Eds.), Leading Against the Grain: Lessons for Creating Just and Equitable Schools, New York: Teachers College Press, 2018, 14-22, on pages 18 and 22 cites “Women’s Empowerment: The Insights of Wangari Maathai,” 2013.
  2. Waters, Julie. The Mauritian Novel: Fictions of Belonging, University of Liverpool Press, 2018 on pages 75 and 229 cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence, 1996.”
  3. Fiala, Andrew, “Pacifism,” Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, rev. 2018, cites “Philosophy of Nonviolence in Africa,” 2017.
  4. Bell, Dorian, Globalizing Race: Antisemitism and Empire in French and European Culture, Northwestern University Press, 2018, cites “Critics of Boers or Africans? Arendt’s Treatment of South Africa”, 1997.
  5. Leonardo, Zeus and Michael Singh, “Fanon, Education, and the Fact of Coloniality,” in Kalervo N. Gulson, Stephen Parker, Trevor Gale (Eds.), Policy and Inequality in Education, Springer, 2017, 91-110, on pages 99, 109 cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence, 1996.”
  6. Ochwa-Echel, James and Rosemary Onyango, “African Women and Social Transformation: Exploring Wangari Maathai’s Activism,” in Africology: The Journal of Pan African Studies, vo.12, no.6, November 2018, pages 99, 101, 109, cites “Women’s Empowerment: The Insights of Wangari Maathai,” 2013.
  7. Oyowe, Oritsegbubemi Anthony, “Personhood and the Strongly Normative Constraint,” Philosophy East and West, University of Hawai’i Press, 68/3, July 2018, 783-801, 10.1353/pew.2018.0073, on pages 796, 798, 801 cites “Maasai Conceptions of Personhood,” 2002.
  8. Mutua, Eddah and Kikuko Omori, “A Cross-Cultural Approach to Environmental and Peace Work: Wangari Maathai’s Use of Mottainai in Kenya,” The Journal of Social Encounters 2/1 (2018), on pages 29, 36, cites “Women’s Empowerment: The Insights of Wangari Maathai,” 2013.
  9. Gichure, Christine. “Human Nature and Identity in Muntu Anthropology and Ubuntu Worldview,” Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy, 2018, on pages 2, 8 cites “The Wisdom of African Sages,” 1998.
  10. Crapo, Ruthanne and Matthew Palombo, “Postcolonial Pedagogy and the Art of Oral Dialogues,” AAPT Studies in Pedagogy 3 (2017), 1-22, on p. 21 cites “African Sage Philosophy and Socrates,” 2002.
  11. Robinson-Morris, David, Ubuntu and Buddhism in Higher Education: An Ontological Rethinking, Routledge, 2018, on pages 37, 47, 201 cites “African Sage-Philosophers in Action,” 1995, and “The Wisdom of African Sages,” 1997.
  12. Ikuenobe, Polycarp (2017), “Matolino’s misunderstanding of Menkiti’s African moral view of the person and community,” South African Journal of Philosophy, 36:4, 553-567, cites “Maasai Concepts of Personhood,” 2002.
  13. Seabra, Murilo, Laura Tolton and Luke Prendergast, “Neutralizando o Argumento da Qualidade: Resultados Reliminares de um Estudo de Filosofia Experimental,” REVISTA IDEAÇÃO, N. 35, JAN./JUN. 2017,133-191, on pages 136, 190 cites “Sage Philosophy: Criteria that Distinguish It from Ethnophilosophy” 2007.
  14. Brown, Jason. Counseling Diversity in Context, University of Toronto Press, 2017, on p. 230 cites “Globalization and the Crisis in Detroit,” 2015.
  15. Agozino, Biko, 2017. “The View Beyond Looking: Isaac Julien’s Frantz Fanon: Black Skin, White Mask.” in Karib – Nordic Journal for Caribbean Studies, 3(1), 1-7, on pages 6, 7 cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence,” 1996.
  16. Mosima, Pius Maija. Philosophic Sagacity and Intercultural Philosophy: Beyond Odera Oruka. Leiden, Netherlands: African Studies Center, 2016, on pages viii, 27-29, 49, 67, 69-70, 79, 80, 102-103, 113-117, 183, cites my articles, “African Sage-Philosophers in Action” (1996); “Who Counts as a Sage?” 1997; “The Wisdom of African Sages” 1999; “On a Mission to Morally Improve Society” 2000; “African Sage Philosophy and Socrates” 2002; “Sage Philosophy: Criteria that Distinguish It from Ethnophilosophy” 2007.
  17. Honneth, Axel and Jacques Rancière, Recognition or Disagreement: A Critical Encounter on the Politics of Freedom, Equality, and Identity, Columbia University Press (2016) on page 203 cites “The Struggle for Recognition in the Philosophy of Axel Honneth,” 2003.
  18. Hallberg, D. and M. Ossewaarde, “Protest and recognition in the Bulgarian Summer 2013 movement,” in Protest, Social Movements, and Global Democracy since 2011 : New Perspectives, Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change vol. 39, Emerald Books, 2016, on pages 88 and 106 cites “The Struggle for Recognition,” 2003.
  19. Ma, Lin and Jaap van Brakel, Fundamentals of Comparative and Intercultural Philosophy SUNY Press, 2016, on pages 306, 389 cites “Sage Philosophy: Criteria that Distinguish it from Ethno-philosophy,” 2007.
  20. Cao, Benito. Environment and Citizenship, Routledge, 2015, on pp. 128, 272, cites “Women’s Empowerment: The Insights of Wangari Maathai,” 2013.
  21. Ikuenobe, Polycarp. “Relational autonomy, personhood, and African traditions,” Philosophy East and West4 (Oct. 2015), 1005-1029, on pages 1006-07 and 1026 cites “Maasai Concepts of Personhood,” 2002.
  22. Metz, Thaddeus. “African Political Philosophy” in Hugh Lafollette (Ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2015, 1-9, on pp. 4 and 8 cites “Unfair Distribution of Resources in Africa,” 2003.
  23. Couper, Scott Everett. “’But Let Us Remember Him Then Never Forget. . . ‘: The Dilution of Satyagraha in South Africa.” In Devarakshanam (Betty) Govinden and Kalpana Hiralal, 1913, Satyagraha, Passive Resistance and its Legacy, New Delhi: Manohar Publishers, 2015, 139-179, on pp. 140, 151 cites “Evaluating the Legacy of Nonviolence in South Africa,” 2006. (Earlier published in Journal of Natal and Zulu History, 2013). DOI: 10.1080/02590123.2013.11964200
  24. Burroughs, Michael, “Hannah Arendt, ‘Reflections on Little Rock,’ and White Ignorance,” Critical Philosophy of Race, 3/1, 2015, 52-78, on pages 74, 78 cites “Critics of Boers or Africans? Arendt’s Treatment of South Africa”, 1997.
  25. Sefa Dei, George J. and Loren Ola Delaney, “Violence and the Interstices of Difference: Working With(in) and Around Fanon,” in Pierre Orelus, Curry Malott and Romina Machecho, Colonized Schooling Exposed: Progressive Voices of Transformative Educational and Social Change, Routledge (2015), 32-50, on pp. 48, 50 cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence,” 1996.
  26. De Sousa Santos, Boaventura. Epistemologies of the South: Justice against Epistemicide, Routledge (2015) on p. 254 cites “Who Counts as a Sage?,” 1997.
  27. Carapico, Sheila, Political Aid and Arab Activism: Democracy Promotion, Justice, and Representation, Cambridge University Press, 2014, on p. 90 ft. 70, and p. 229, cites “Challenges of Founding a New Government in Iraq,” 2005.
  28. Oyowe, Oritsegbubemi Anthony, “Fiction, Culture, and the Concept of a Person,” in Research in African Literatures 45/2 (Summer 2014), on pp. 47 and 61 cites “Maasai Concepts of Personhood,” 2002.
  29. Letseka, Matsephe M., “Did Philosophy Originate in Greece? An Africanist Response,” Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences 5/23 (November 2014), 1302-1307, on pp. 1306, 1307 cites “Sage Philosophy: Criteria that Distinguish it from Ethno-philosophy,” 2007.
  30. Masaka, Dennis and Munamato Chemhuru, “Skin Bleaching and the Question of Identity of Black Zimbabweans: An Afrocentric Critique,” Caribbean Journal of Philosophy 6/1 (2014), 1-22, on pages 14, 21 cites “Critics of Boers or Africans? Arendt’s Treatment of South Africa”, 1997.
  31. Ahmed Hassin, “Non-Government Communications and Conflict Management: The Experience of Iraqi Arab Tribes,” in Sarah Craze and Frieder Lempp (Eds), Communicating Conflict: A Multidisciplinary Perspective, Oxford, UK: Interdisciplinary Press, 2014, 113-124, on page 123 cites “Challenges of Founding a New Government in Iraq,”
  32. Matolino, Bernard. “Exorcising the Communitarian Ghost: D.A. Masolo’s Contribution,” Quest: An African Journal of Philosophy / Revue Africaine de Philosophie, 25/1-2. (2011, posted online 2014), 163-185, on pp. 168, 185, cites “Maasai Concepts of Personhood,” 2002.
  33. Kresse, Kai. “‘Building a humane society’: An intellectual sketch of H. Odera Oruka,” Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya (PAK) New Series, 5/1, June 2013, pp.25-40, on pp. 27, 40 cites “H. Odera Oruka on Moral Reasoning,” 2000; “African Sage Philosophy and Socrates: Midwifery and Method,” 2002; “Maasai Concepts of Personhood: The Roles of Recognition, Community, and Individuality,” 2002; “Sage Philosophy: Criteria that Distinguish it from Ethnophilosophy,” 2007.
  34. Hapanyengwi-Chemhuru, O. “Odera Oruka’s Four Trends in African Philosophy and their Implications for Education in Africa,” in Thought and Practice 5/2 (2013), 40-55, on pp. 44 and 54 cites “Who Counts as a Sage?,” 1998.
  35. Moses, A. Dirk, “Das römische Gespräch in a New Key: Hannah Arendt, Genocide, and the Defense of Republican Civilization,” in Journal of Modern History 85/4, 2013, 867-913, on p. 910 cites “Critics of Boers or Africans? Arendt’s Treatment of South Africa”, 1997.
  36. Kool, Vinod K., “Applications of Gandhian concepts in psychology and allied disciplines,” Indian Journal of Psychiatry 55/6 (Jan. 2013): 235-238, cites “Evaluating the legacy of nonviolence in South Africa,” 2006.
  37. Ambrose, Don. “Socioeconomic Inequality and Giftedness: Suppression and Distortion of High Ability,” Roeper Review, 35 (2013), 81–92, on pages 84, 91 cites “Hannah Arendt on Power,” 1997.
  38. Petherbridge, Danielle. The Critical Theory of Axel Honneth, Lexington Books, 2013, p. 243, cites “The Struggle for Recognition,” 2003.
  39. Graness, Anke. “From Socrates to Odera Oruka: Wisdom and Ethical Commitment,” in Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya (PAK) New Series, 4/2, December 2012, 1-22, on pp. 12, 22 cites “H. Odera Oruka on Moral Reasoning,” 2000 and “African Sage-Philosophers in Action,” 1996.
  40. Owakah, Francis E.A., “Race Ideology and the Conceptualization of Philosophy: The Story of Philosophy in Africa from Placide Tempels to Odera Oruka,” in Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya (PAK) New Series, Vol.4 No.2, December 2012, pp.147-168, on pp. 161, 168 cites “The Wisdom of African Sages,” 1999.
  41. Oyowe, Oritsegbubemi Anthony, “Personhood and Social Power in African Thought” In Alternation: Interdisciplinary Journal for the Study of the Arts and Humanities in

Southern Africa Vol 20, No 1, Special Issue on Race, Power and Indigenous Knowledge Systems, 2013, 203-228, on pp. 217, 228 cites “Maasai Concepts of Personhood,” 2002.

  1. Adjei,Paul Banahene, “The Non-Violent Philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr. in the 21st Century: Implications for the Pursuit of Social Justice in a Global Context,” Journal of Global Citizenship & Equity Education, 3/1 (2013), 80-101, on pp. 94, 100 cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence,” 1996.
  2. Kazeem, Fayemi Ademola “ Odera Oruka and the Question of Methodology in African Philosophy: A Critique,” in Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya (PAK)New Series, Vol.4 No.2, December 2012, pp.185-204, cites “African Sage Philosophers in Action,” 1996, and “Who Counts as a Sage?,” 1998, on pp. 194, 204.
  3. Giddy, Patrick, “’Philosophy for Children in Africa’: Developing a Framework,” South African Journal of Education 32:1 (2012), on pp. 16, 24 cites “African Sage Philosophy and Socrates,” 2002.
  4. Gines, Kathryn, “Reflections on the Legacy and Future of the Continental Tradition with regard to the Critical Philosophy of Race,” The Southern Journal of Philosophy 50/2 (June 2012), 329-344, cites on p. 343 “Critics of Boers or Africans? Arendt’s Treatment of South Africa in The Origins of Totalitarianism,” 1997.
  5. Mbat, Jerome P., “A Critical Survey of the Logic of Genetic Engineering and the Quest for Sustainable Agriculture towards Development in Africa,” Journal of Biology, Agriculture and Healthcare, 2/8 (2012), on page 7 cites “African Philosophers on Global Wealth Distribution,” 2002.
  6. Piromalli, Elanora, Marxism and Cultural Studies in the Development of Axel Honneth’s Theory of Recognition,” Culture, Theory, and Critique 53/ 3, November 2012, pages 249-263, on p. 263 cites “The Struggle for Recognition,” 2003.
  7. Thaler, Mathias, João Cardoso Rosas, and Iñigo González. “Filosofia Política.” In Filosofia: Uma Introdução por Disciplinas, edited by Pedro Galvão, 175–213. Extra Coleção 155. Lisbon: Edições 70, 2012, on pp. 193, 210 cites “The Struggle for Recognition in the Philosophy of Axel Honneth,” 2003.
  8. de Sousa Santos, Boaventura, “Public Sphere and Epistemologies of the South,” Africa Development, Vol. XXXVII, No. 1, 2012, pp. 43 – 67, on pp. 64-65 cites “Who Counts as a Sage?,” 1997.
  9. Wärn, Mats, A Lebanese Vanguard for the Islamic Revolution (Stockholm Studies in Politics Vo. 149, Stockholm University, 2012), on pp. 322-23, 378 cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence,” 1996.
  10. Krishnan, Madhu, “Abjection and the fetish: Reconsidering the construction of the postcolonial exotic in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Half of a Yellow Sun,” in Journal of Postcolonial Writing 48:1 (2012), 26-38, cites on pp. 32, 38, “Critics of Boers or Africans? Arendt’s Treatment of South Africa,” 1997.
  11. Mbat, Jerome, “A Critical Survey of the Logic of Genetic Engineering and the Quest for Sustainable Agriculture towards Development in Africa,” Journal of Biology, Agriculture and Healthcare 2/8 (2012), 1-7, cites on pp, 5, 7, “African Philosophers On Global Wealth Redistribution”, 2001.
  12. Coric, Dragan, “Modernity, relationship of truth and lies, and their ethical, philosophical and social values (МОДЕРНОСТ ОДНОСА ИСТИНЕ И ЛАЖИ И ЊИХОВА ЕТИЧКА, ФИЛОЗОФСКА И ДРУШТВЕНА ВРЕДНОСТ),” Proceedings of the Faculty of Law, Novi Sad, 46/2 (2012), 327-337, on p. 335 cites “Arendt on Language and Lying in Politics,” 2008.
  13. Bowd, Gavin P. and Daniel W. Clayton, “Geographical Warfare in the Tropics: Yves Lacoste and the Vietnam War,” Annals of the Association of American Geographers, March 2012, cites on pp. 15 and 19 “Arendt on Language and Lying in Politics,” 2008.
  14. Kresse K. (2011) “’African Humanism’ and a Case Study from the Swahili Coast.” In: Dierksmeier C., Amann W., von Kimakowitz E., Spitzeck H., Pirson M. (eds) Humanistic Ethics in the Age of Globality. Humanism in Business Series. Palgrave Macmillan, London, cites “African sage philosophy and Socrates,” 2002.
  15. Langbehn, Volker and Mohammad Salama, German Colonialism: Race, the Holocaust, and Postwar Germany (Columbia University Press, 2011), p. 91, cites “Critics of Boers or Africans? Arendt’s Treatment of South Africa in The Origins of Totalitarianism,” 1997.
  16. Graneß, Anke Das menschliche Minimum: Globale Gerechtigkeit aus afrikanischer Sicht Henry Odera Oruka (Campus Wissenshaft, Frankfurt, 2011), pp. 73-74, cites “Who Counts as a Sage?,” 1997, and “Sage Philosophy: Criteria that Distinguish it from Ethnophilosophy,” 2007; pp. 83 and 87, discusses and cites “Henry Odera Oruka on Moral Reasoning,” 2000; on p. 85, discusses and cites ““Zur Praxis der afrikanischen ‘Weisen’”, 1997; p. 86, discusses and cites “On a Mission to Morally Improve One’s Society,” 2000; citations of the above, p. 376.
  17. Bazac, Ana. “Travail et Action: La Philosophie Face au Défi du Caché,” F i l o s o f i e: Analele U n i v e r s i t ă ţ i i d i n C r a i o v a 27/1 (2011) 117-133, cites on p. 132 “Arendt on Language and Lying in Politics,” 2008.
  18. Adem, Seifudein (2011), “Conflict Prevention in Japan,” in Manas Chatterji, Darvesh Gopal, Savita Singh (ed.) Governance, Development and Conflict (Contributions to Conflict Management, Peace Economics and Development, Volume 18), Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp.263-280, citation pp. 276, 381, cites “The Wisdom of African Sages,” 2001.
  19. Trivedi, Harish (2011), “Revolutionary Nonviolence,” in Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, 13:4, 521-549, on p. 549 cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence,” 1996.
  20. Mantena, Karuna, “Genealogies of Catastrophe: Arendt on the Logic and Legacy of Imperialism,” in Benhabib, Seyla (Ed.), Politics in Dark Times: Encounters with Hannah Arendt (Cambridge University Press, 2010), 83-112, on pp. 93, n. 29 and 103, n. 53, cites “Critics of Boers or Africans? Arendt’s Treatment of South Africa in The Origins of Totalitarianism,” 1997. Note: Also published in translation, “Genealogien einer Katastrophe (Genealogies of a Disaster),” in Schulze Wessel , Julia, Volk, Christian; Salzborn , Samuel (eds.),  Ambivalenzen der Ordnung: Der Staat im Denken Hannah Arendts Reihe (Ambivalences of Order: The State in the Thought of Hannah Arendt). Springer, 2013, pp 43-67, cites “Critics of Boers or Africans?, 1997”
  21. Ahluwalia, Pal, Out of Africa: Post-Structuralism’s Colonial Roots (Routledge, 2010), pp. 65-66, 181, 191, cites and discusses “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation,” 1996.
  22. Helliker, Kirk, “The State of Emancipation – With, Within, Without?,” in Interface: A Journal For and About Social Movements (2/1, May 2010), pp. 118-143, cites on 126, 142, “Criticisms of Multiparty Democracy: Wamba-dia-Wamba and Arendt,” 1998.
  23. Ochwada, Hannington, “Oruka, Henry Odera” encyclopedia entry in Abiola Irele and Biodun Jeyifo (Eds.), Oxford Encyclopedia of African Thought Volume One (Oxford University Press, 2010), pp. 198-200, cites on pp. 199-200 “The Wisdom of African Sages,” 1999.
  24. Sefa Dei, George Jerry and Marlon Simmons, Fanon and Education: Thinking Through Pedagogical Possibilities (Peter Lang, 2010), pp. 15, 26, 93, 104, cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation,” 1996.
  25. Kawano, Yumiko, “Fanon’s Psychology of the Mind: The “Yellow” Colonizer and the Racialized Minorities in Japan,” in George Jerry Sefa Dei, Fanon and the Counterinsurgency of Education, 157–175, cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation,” 1996.
  26. Noor, Farish A. “Terror and the Politics of Containment: Analysing the Discourse of the ‘War on Terror’ and its workings of Power,” Human Architecture 8/2 (Fall 2010), 47-65, on pp. 49, 65, cites my book, Philosophical Perspectives on the ‘War on Terrorism,’
  27. Laurent, Sylvie. “La non-violence est-elle possible?: Gandhi, King, Mandela,” La Vie des Idees, College de France, 23 Julliet 2010, in note 37 cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation,” 1996.
  28. Ramose, Mogobe. “The Death of Democracy and the Resurrection of Timocracy,” Journal of Moral Education, 39/3, September 2010, pp. 291–303, on pp. 296, 303, cites “African philosophers on global wealth distribution,” 2002.
  29. Vest, J.L. “Perverse and Necessary Dialogues in African Philosophy,” Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya 1, No. 2 (2010), p. 9 n. 5; p. 22, cites “Who Counts as a Sage?,1997.
  30. Klausen, Jimmy Casas, “Hannah Arendt’s Primitivism,” Political Theory 38/3 (2010), 394-423, p. 418 n.10, 11, cites “Critics of Boers or Africans? Arendt’s Treatment of South Africa in The Origins of Totalitarianism,” 1997.
  31. Nash, Kate, “Exploring Power and Trust in Documentary: A Study of Tom Zubrycki’s Molly and Mobarack,” Studies in Documentary Film 4/1 (2010), 21-33, on 24 and 32 cites “Hannah Arendt on Power,” 1997.
  32. de Sousa Santos, Boaventura, Refundación del Estado en América Latina: Perspectivas desde una epistemología del Sur. Lima, Peru: Instituto Internacional de Derecho y Sociedad, 2010, on pages 47, 149 cites “Who Counts as a Sage?,” 1997.
  33. Janz, Bruce B., Philosophy in an African Place (Lexington/ Rowman and Littlefield, 2009), p. 35 n. 39, cites “Ways in Which Oral Philosophy is Superior to Written Philosophy: A Look at Odera Oruka’s Rural Sages,” 1996.
  34. Roberts, Neil, “Recognition, Power, and Agency,” Political Theory 37/2 (2009), 296-309, on 308 n. 5 cites “The Struggle for Recognition in the Philosophy of Axel Honneth, Applied to the Current South African Situation and its Call for an ‘African Renaissance,’” 2003.
  35. Poe, Danielle, book review of Philosophical Perspectives on the ‘War on Terrorism,’ (2006), in Teaching Philosophy 32:4 (December 2009), 424-426.
  36. Johansen, Jørgen, “Waves of Nonviolence and the New Revolutionary Movements,” in Elavie Ndura-Ouédraogo, Matt Meyer (Eds.), Seeds of New Hope: Pan-African Peace Studies for the 21st Century, Africa World Press, 2009, cites “Evaluating the Legacy of Nonviolence in South Africa,” 2006.
  37. Brown, Charles and Emmer, C.E., book review of Philosophical Perspectives on the ‘War on Terrorism’ (2006), H Net, March 2009.

http://www.h-net.msu.edu/reviews/showrev.php?id=23463

  1. Wettstein, Florian, Multinational Corporations and Global Justice: Human Rights Obligations of a Quasi-Governmental Institution (Stanford University Press, 2009), on pp. 189, 191, 385, cites and discusses “Hannah Arendt on Power,” 1997.
  2. Hallen, Barry, A Short History of African Philosophy Second Edition, Indiana University Press, 2009, on pp. 73, 179, and 192, cites “Criticisms of Multiparty Democracy: Wamba-dia-Wamba and Arendt,” 1998, and “Sage Philosophy: Criteria that Distinguish it from Ethnophilosophy,” 2007.
  3. Christensen, Kit Richard, Nonviolence, Peace and Justice: A Philosophical Introduction (Broadview Press, 2009), p. 108 cites “Contemporary African Sages and Queen Mothers: Their Leadership Roles in Conflict Resolution,” 2000.
  4. Kalisa, Chantal, Violence in Francophone African and Caribbean Women’s Literature (University of Nebraska Press, 2009), pp. 189, 207, 221, cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation: A Comparison to Gandhi and Mandela,” 1996.
  5. Ambrose, Don and Tracy Cross, Morality, Ethics, and Gifted Minds (Springer, 2009), citations and discussions pp. 57,60, 71, 351, 361, of “Hannah Arendt on Power,” 1997.
  6. Gallois, William. The Administration of Sickness: Medicine and Ethics in 19th Century Algeria Palgrave MacMillan 2009. Cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation: A Comparison to Gandhi and Mandela,” 1996.
  7. Azenabor, Godwin, “Odera Oruka’s Philosophic Sagacity: Problems and Challenges of Conversation Method in African Philosophy”, in Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya 1/1 (2009), 69-86, on pp. 78, 83, 86, cites and discusses “Is Elijah Masinde a Sage-Philosopher? The Dispute between H. Odera Oruka and Chaungo Barasa,” 1997, and “African Sage-Philosophers in Action: H. Odera Oruka’s Challenges to the Narrowly Academic Role of the Philosopher,” 1996.
  8. Mayton, Daniel M., Nonviolent Peace Psychology: Intrapersonal, Interpersonal, Societal (Springer, 2009), pp. 24, 286, 272, cites “Evaluating the Legacy of Nonviolence in South Africa,” 2006.
  9. Kresse, Kai. “Can Wisdom be Taught?  Kant, Sage Philosophy, and Ethnographic Reflections from the Swahili Coast.” In Michel Ferrari and Georges Potworowski, Teaching for Wisdom:  Cross-cultural Perspectives for Teaching Wisdom, Springer Netherlands, 2008, pp. 184-204. Cites “Should Women Love ‘Wisdom’? Evaluating the Ethiopian Wisdom Tradition,” 1999; “African Sage Philosophy and Socrates: Midwifery and Method,” 2002; “Maasai Concepts of Personhood,” 2002, “Is Elijah Masinde a Sage Philosopher?”, 1997, “Contemporary African Sages and Queen Mothers,” 2000.
  10. Van Binsbergen, Wim M.J., “Traditional Wisdom – Its Expressions and Representations in Africa and Beyond,” Quest: Philosophical Discussions XXII/1-2 (2008), 49-120, cites on pp. 67 n. 4, and 115, “The Wisdom of African Sages,” 1999.
  11. Smith, Daniel, “Counter-Hegemony and Sage Philosophy” in William Sweet, George F. McLean, Tomonobu Imamichi, Safak Ural, O. Faruk Akyol (Eds.), The Dialogue of Cultural Traditions: Global Perspective, Washington, D.C.: Council for Research in Values and Philosophy, 2008, 567-582, cites my paper presentation at the World Congress of Philosophy, 2003 (published later as “Sage Philosophy: Criteria that Distinguish it from Ethnophilosophy,” 2007).
  12. Ajei, M. and M.B. Ramose, “From ‘Man is the Measure of all Things’ to Money is the Measure of All Things: A Dialogue between Protagoras and African Philosophy,” Phronimon 9/1, 2008, on 31, 36, 39 cites “African philosophers on global wealth distribution,” 2002.
  13. Landesman, Bruce M., Book Review of Presbey, Philosophical Perspectives on the ‘War on Terrorism” (2006), in Philosophy in Review 28/5 (2008), 366-368.
  14. Dick, John A. Book review of Philosophical Perspectives on the ‘War on Terrorism” (2006), in Ethical Perspectives: Journal of the European Ethics Network 15/3 (2008), pp. 421-22.
  15. Katz, Joanne and David Tushaus, “Terrorism and Human Rights: The South Africa and Northern Ireland Experiences,” Journal of the Institute of Justice and International Studies 182 (2008), pp. 182-99, on pp. 189, 190, 199, discusses and cites “Evaluating the Legacy of Nonviolence in South Africa,” 2006.
  16. Kearsley, Roy, Church, Community and Power, Ashgate, 2008, cites “Who Counts as a Sage? Problems in the Further Implementation of Sage Philosophy,” 1997.
  17. Orosco, Jose-Antonio, Cesar Chavez and the Common Sense of Nonviolence (University of New Mexico Press, 2008), pp. 46, 121, discusses and cites “Hannah Arendt on Nonviolence and Political Action,” 1993.
  18. Verdeja, Ernesto, “A Critical Theory of Reparative Justice,” Constellations 15/2 (2008), p. 221, cites “The Struggle for Recognition in the Philosophy of Axel Honneth,” 2003.
  19. Tafesse, Talargie Y., “Ethiopians in Social Context: The Impact of Immigration to the United States on Gender Roles in Marriage,” in Cody C. Lorance (Ed.), Ethnographic Chicago (Chicago Metropolitan Baptist Association, 2008), pp. 232, 260, cites “Should Women Love Wisdom?, 1999.
  20. Ginter, Stefan, Moderne Afrikanische Philosophie: Henry Odera Oruka, (GRIN – Verlag fur Akademische Texte, 2000), p. 9, cites “Zur Praxis der afrikanischen ‘Weisen’: H. Odera Orukas Herausforderung an die Selbstbeschrankung akademischer Philosophen,
  21. Gines, Kathryn T. “Race Thinking and Racism in Hannah Arendt’s The Origins of Totalitarianism.” In Hannah Arendt and the Uses of History: Imperialism, Nation, Race, and Genocide. Eds. Richard H. King and Dan Stone. New York: Berghahn Books, 2007, 38–53, on pp. 41, 48, 52-53, discusses “Critics of Boers or Africans? Arendt’s Treatment of South Africa in The Origins of Totalitarianism,” 1997.
  22. Kool, V.K., Psychology of Nonviolence and Aggression (Palgrave MacMillan, 2007), pp. 6, 60,128, and 221, cites “Evaluating the Legacy of Nonviolence in South Africa,” 2006.
  23. Rettová, Afrophone Philosophies: Reality and Challenge (Zdeněk Susa Středokluky, 2007) on pages 34, 38, 43, 137 cites “Who Counts as a Sage?,” 1998.
  24. Gichure, Christine Wanjiru, “Philosophy: what is it all about?” ChemChemi: International Journal of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences of Kenyatta University,4,1 (2007), page 102 cites “The Wisdom of African Sages,” 1999.
  25. Leslie, Isis. “Internationalizing Political Theory Courses,” PS: Political Science and Politics 40:1 (Jan 2007), 108–110, cites “The Wisdom of African Sages,” 2001.
  26. Okolo, M.S.C., African Literature as Political Philosophy (ZED Books/CODESRIA, 2007), p. 157 cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation,” 1996.
  27. Kresse, Kai. Philosophising in Mombasa: Knowledge, Islam and Intellectual Practice on the Swahili Coast (International African Library). Edinburg University Press, 2007, cites “Is Elijah Masinde a Sage-Philosopher? The Dispute between H. Odera Oruka and Chaungo Barasa,” 1997; “Should Women Love ‘Wisdom’? Evaluating the Ethiopian Wisdom Tradition,” 1999; “African Sage Philosophy and Socrates: Midwifery and Method,” 2002; “Maasai Concepts of Personhood,” 2002.
  28. Mukherjee, Pablo. “Doomed to Smallness: Violence, VS Naipaul, and the Global South,” The Yearbook of English Studies 37:1 (1 January 2007), 209–226, cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation: A Comparison to Gandhi and Mandela,” 1996.
  29. Jayatilleka, Dayan. Fidel’s Ethics of Violence: The Moral Dimension of the Political Thought of Fidel Castro, London: Pluto Press, 2007, pp. 13-14, 202. Cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation,” 1996.
  30. van Leeuwen, Bart. “A Formal Recognition of Social Attachments: Expanding Axel Honneth’s Theory of Recognition,” Inquiry 50:2 (2007), 180–205, 204, 205n62 cites “The Struggle for Recognition in the Philosophy of Axel Honneth, Applied to the Current South African Situation and its Call for an ‘African Renaissance,’” 2003.
  31. Leslie, Isis, “Internationalizing Political Theory Courses,” part of “Internationalizing the Undergraduate Curriculum,” Benjamin Barber, et.al., in PS: Political Science and Politics 40/1 (Jan. 2007), pp. 105-120, citation p. 110 cites “The Wisdom of African Sages,” 2001.
  32. Ochieng’-Odhiambo, , “Philosophic Sagacity: A classical comprehension and relevance to post-colonial social spaces in Africa,” QUEST: An African Journal of Philosophy / Revue Africaine de Philosophie XXI (2007), 91-108, cites “Is Elijah Masinde a Sage?,” (1997), p. 104.
  33. Ekanola, Adebola Babatunde. “National Integration and the Survival of Nigeria in the 21st Century,” Journal of Social, Political and Economic Studies 31:3 (Fall 2006), 279–293, 292n44 cites “Philosophic Sages in Kenya Debate Ethnicity’s Role in Politics,” 2002.
  34. Ikuenobe, Polycarp. “The Idea of Personhood in Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart,” Philosophia Africana 9:2 (August 2006), 117–131, cites “Maasai Concepts of Personhood: The Roles of Recognition, Community, and Individuality,” 2002.
  35. Ikuenobe, Polycarp. Philosophical Perspectives on Communalism and Morality in African Traditions. Lanhan, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 2006, 51–52, cites “Maasai Concepts of Personhood,” 2002.
  36. Masolo, D. A. “African Sage Philosophy,” Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2006, http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/african-sage/ quotes “Who Counts as a Sage? Problems in the Further Implementation of Sage Philosophy,” 1997.
  37. Osei, Joseph. “The Value of African Taboos for Biodiversity and Sustainable Development,” Journal of Sustainable Development in Africa (Fall 2006), cites “H. Odera Oruka on Moral Reasoning,” 2000.
  38. Cohen, Elliot D. and Albert Ellis, The New Rational Therapy: Thinking Your Way to Serenity, Success (Rowman and Littlefield, 2006), on p. 179, n. 10, cites “Hannah Arendt on Power,” 1997.
  39. Horsthemke, C. “The idea of the African university in the twenty first century: Some reflections on Afrocentrism and Afroscepticism,” South African Journal of Higher Education 20/4 (2006), 449-465, on pages 461, 465, cites “Should Women Love ‘Wisdom’?” 2002.
  40. van Leeuwen, Bart. “Social Attachments as Conditions for the Condition of the Good Life? A Critique of Will Kymlicka’s Moral Monism,” Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (May 2006), 401–428, 410 cites “The Struggle for Recognition in the Philosophy of Axel Honneth, Applied to the Current South African Situation and its Call for an ‘African Renaissance,’” 2003.
  41. Ekanola, Adebola Babatunde, “National Integration and the Survival of Nigeria in the 21st Century,” Journal of Social, Political and Economic Studies 31/3 (2006), 279-293, on p. 292 cites “Philosophic Sages in Kenya Debate Ethnicity’s Role in Politics,” 2002.
  42. Ambrose, Don. “Aspiration Growth, Talent Development, and Self-Fulfillment in a Context of Democratic Erosion,” Roeper Review 28:1 (Fall 2005), 11–19, citation and substantive discussion of “Hannah Arendt on Power,” 1998.
  43. Benraad, Myriam. “Irak: Avancées et écueils d’une transition (2005–2006).” In Rémy Leveau and Frédéric. Afrique du Nord Moyen-Orient, ed. 2005–2006, Les incertitudes du “Grand Moyen-Orient.” Paris: La Documentation française, 2006, also found at http://moyen-orient.sciences-po.fr/articles_pour_revue_en_ligne/14062007%20Myriam%20BENRAAD%20-%20Irak%20_%20Avanc%E9es%20et%20%E9cueils%20d’une%20transition%20(2005-2006).pdf, 10n33 cites “Challenges of Founding a New Government in Iraq,” 2005.
  44. Mkhwanazi, E. F., and M. B. Ramose. Thought and Practice in African Philosophy: Review Article,” Tydskrif vir letterkunde 42: 2 (2005), 161–175, book review of Thought and Practice in African Philosophy, 2002, and reviews “African Philosophers on Global Wealth Distribution,” 2002.
  45. Young, Robert J.C., “Fanon and the Turn to Armed Struggle,” in Wasafiri 44 (Spring 2005), Frantz Fanon Special Issue, 33-41, on p. 41 cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation,” 1996.
  46. Vest, Jennifer Lisa, “The Promise of Caribbean Philosophy: How it can Contribute to a ‘New Dialogue,’” Caribbean Studies 33/2 (July – December 2005), pp. 3-34, pp. 21 and 28, cites “Who Counts as a Sage?,” 2002.
  47. Osei, Joseph. “Review of The African Philosophy Reader,” Essays in Philosophy 6:2 (June 2005), 1,8, reviews “Should Women Love Wisdom? Evaluating the Ethiopian Wisdom Tradition,”
  48. Adem, Seifudein. “Cultures of Political Recycling and Conflict Resolution in Japan: Any Lessons for Africa?” African and Asian Studies 3:1 (2004), 3–31, 15, 30 cites “The Wisdom of African Sages,” 2001.
  49. Hobuß, Steffi, Iris Därmann, and Ulrich Lölke, Konversionen: Fremderfahrungen in Ethnologischer und Interkultureller Perspektive (Studien zur Interkulturellen Philosophie 13 (German Edition) Rodopi, 2004, p. 208 cites Odera Oruka on Moral Reasoning,” 2000.
  50. Bowman, Betsy, and Bob Stone. “The End as Present in the Means in Sartre’s Morality and History: Birth and Re-inventions of an Existential Moral Standard,” Sartre Studies International 10: 2 (2004), 1–27, 25 cites “Hannah Arendt on Nonviolence and Political Action,” 1993.
  51. Nwosu, Steve. “Morality in African Traditional Society,” New Political Science 26:2 (2004), 207 cites “The Wisdom of African Sages,” 1999.
  52. Deranty, Jean-Philippe. “Injustice, Violence, and Social Struggle: The Critical Potential of Axel Honneth’s Theory of Recognition,” Critical Horizons 5 (2004), 297–322, 320n20 cites “The Struggle for Recognition in the Philosophy of Axel Honneth, Applied to the Current South African Situation and Its Call for an ‘African Renaissance,’” 2003.
  53. Sabine, Mark. “Gender, Race, and Violence in Luís Bernardo Honwana’s Nós Matámos o Cão-Tinhoso: The Emasculation of the African Patriarch”. Lusophone Studies 2 (2004): 23-44, cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation,” 1996.
  54. Kalumba, Kibujjo M., “Sage Philosophy: Its Methodology, Results, Significance, and Future.” In A Companion to African Philosophy. Ed. Kwasi Wiredu. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004, 274–281, 281 cites “H. Odera Oruka on Moral Reasoning: Rooted in the East African Prophetic Tradition,” 1998.
  55. Santos, Boaventura de Sousa. “A Critique of Lazy Reason: Against the Waste of Experience.” In The Modern World-System in the Longue Durée. Ed. I. Wallerstein. Boulder, Colo.: Paradigm, 2004, 192, 195 cites “Who Counts as a Sage? Problems in the Further Implementation of Sage Philosophy,” 1997.
  56. Stewart, Julia. Stewart’s Quotable Africa. Johannesburg: Penguin Global, 2004, 309, cites “Who Counts as a Sage? Problems in the Further Implementation of Sage Philosophy,” 1997.
  57. Ahluwalia, Pal. “Fanon’s Nausea: the Hegemony of the White Nation,” Social Identities 9:3 (2003), p. 348, cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation,” 1996.
  58. Carabine, Deirdre. “Outsider on the Inside? Thinking about an Intercultural Understanding of Gender Identity,” Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 77, 2003, 23-36, cites on p. 35 two of my articles, “Who Counts as a Sage?,” 1997, and “Philosophic Sages in Kenya Debate Ethnicity’s Role in Politics,” 2002.
  59. Welch, Ashton Wesley. “Explorations in African Political Thought: Identity, Community, Ethics,” Ethnic Studies Review 26:2, Ethnic NewsWatch (ENW) (2003), 92–94; 92–93 cites and discusses “The Wisdom of African Sages,” 2001.
  60. Santos, Boaventura de Sousa. “Para uma sociologia das ausências e uma sociologia das emergências” (“Towards a Sociology of Absences and a Sociology of Emergence”), v. 63 (2002), on pages 263, 278, cites “Who Counts as a Sage?,” 1997.
  61. Azenabor, Godwin. Understanding the Problems in African Philosophy, 2nd ed. Lagos, Nigeria: First Academic Publishers, 2002, 104–105, 168 cites “African Sage-Philosophers in Action: H. Odera Oruka’s Challenges to the Narrowly Academic Role of the Philosopher,” 1996.
  62. Bell, Richard H. Understanding African Philosophy: A Cross-cultural Approach to Classical and Contemporary Issues. New York: Routledge, 2002, 148n58, cites “The Wisdom of African Sages,” 2001.
  63. Hoffman, Gerd-Rudiger, “The Balance of Power in the Dialogue between African and Western Philosophy,” in Raul Fornet-Betancourt (ed.), Interaction and Asymmetry between Cultures in the Context of Globalization (Frankfurt am Main, IKO – Verlag fur Interkulturelle Kommunikation, 2002), 225-247, on pp. 234 and 246, discusses and cites “Akan‑Chiefs und Königsmütter im heutigen Ghana,”
  64. Chaungo Barasa, “Narrowing the Gap Between Past Practices and Future Thoughts in Transitional Kenyan Cultural Model, for Sustainable Family Livelihood Security.” In Thought and Practice in African Philosophy. Eds. Gail M. Presbey, Daniel Smith, Pamela Abuya, and Oriare Nyarwath. Nairobi, Kenya: Konrad Adenauer Foundation, 2002, 217–222, 221, 222n7 cites “African Sage-Philosophers in Action: H. Odera Oruka’s Challenges to the Narrowly Academic Role of the Philosopher,” 1996.
  65. Gutema, Bekele. “The Role of Sagacity in Resolving Conflicts Peacefully.” In Thought and Practice in African Philosophy. Eds. Gail M. Presbey, Daniel Smith, Pamela Abuya, and Oriare Nyarwath. Nairobi, Kenya: Konrad Adenauer Foundation, 2002, 207–216, 213, 216n13 cites “African Sage-Philosophers in Action,” 1996.
  66. Kalumba, Kibujjo M. “A Critique of Oruka’s Philosophic Sagacity,” Philosophia Africana 5:1 (March 2002), 42n18 cites “H. Odera Oruka on Moral Reasoning,” 1998.
  67. Lee, Lester. “Book review of Explorations in African Political Thought,” Ethics & International Affairs 16:1 (2002), 159 reviews “The Wisdom of African Sages,” conference paper, 1999.
  68. Ochieng’-Odhiambo, F. “The Evolution of Sagacity: The Three Stages of Oruka’s Philosophy,” Philosophia Africana 5:1 (2002), p. 30n11 cites “Is Elijah Masinde a Sage-Philosopher?” 1997.
  69. Eckholt, Margit, Poetik der Kultur: Bausteine Einer Interkulturellen Dogmatischen Methodenlehre (Herder, 2002) pp. 228, 659, cites “Zur Praxis der afrikanischen ‘Weisen’: H. Odera Orukas Herausforderung an die Selbstbeschrankung akademischer Philosophen,
  70. Sumner, Claude. “The Status of Women in Ethiopian Sapiential and Philosophical Literature: Information and Critique.” In Thought and Practice in African Philosophy. Eds. Gail M. Presbey, Daniel Smith, Pamela Abuya, and Oriare Nyarwath. Nairobi, Kenya: Konrad Adenauer Foundation, 2002, 171–190, 171-172, 186, 187n3, 188n44, 189nn63, 69 cites and discusses “Should Women Love ‘Wisdom’? Evaluating the Ethiopian Wisdom Tradition,”
  71. Chukwu, Cletus. African Philosophy: The Task of Addressing Contemporary Social Problems,” in Thought and Practice in African Philosophy. Eds. Gail M. Presbey, Daniel Smith, Pamela Abuya, and Oriare Nyarwath. Nairobi, Kenya: Konrad Adenauer Foundation, 2002, 247-254, on pages 252, 254 cites “The Wisdom of African Sages,” 1999.
  72. Ashcroft, Bill. Post-Colonial Transformation. New York: Routledge, 2001, 235 cites “Critics of Boers or Africans? Arendt’s Treatment of South Africa in The Origins of Totalitarianism,” 1997.
  73. Laytin, Adam. “Frantz Fanon and the Question of Palestinian Colonialism,” Radical Philosophy Review 4/1-2 (2001), 193-204, on pp. 194, 201, 204 cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation,” 1996.
  74. Lölke, Ulrich. Kritische Traditionen: Afrika. Philosophie als Ort der Dekolonisation Frankfurt/M.: IKO-Verlag fiir lnterkulturelle Kommunikation, 2001, cites and discusses “Zur Praxis der afrikanischen ‘Weisen’: H. Odera Orukas Herausforderung an die Selbstbeschrankung akademischer Philosophen (African Sage-Philosophers in Action: H. Odera Oruka’s Challenges to the Narrowly Academic Role of the Philosopher), 199
  75. Berger Gould, Benina. “Ritual as Resistance: Tibetan Women and Nonviolence.” In Frontline Feminisms: Women, War, and Resistance. Ed. Marguerite Waller. New York: Routledge, 2001, 213–233, 233 cites “Hannah Arendt on Nonviolence and Political Action,” 1993.
  76. Kresse, Kai. “Zur afrikanischen Philosophiedebatte: Ein Einstieg Zur afrikanischen Philosophiedebatte,” Polylog Forum for Intercultural Philosophy 2 (2000), http://www.polylog.org/lit/0102/re01-de.htm, cites “Zur Praxis der afrikanischen ‘Weisen’: H. Odera Orukas Herausforderung an die Selbstbeschrankung akademischer Philosophen” (“African Sage-Philosophers in Action: H. Odera Oruka’s Challenges to the Narrowly Academic Role of the Philosopher”), 1997; and “Who Counts as a Sage? Problems in the Further Implementation of Sage Philosophy,” 1997.
  77. Lor, P “Libraries in the African Renaissance: African Experience and Prospects for Survival in the Information Age,” The International Information and Library Review 32:2 (June 2000), 213–236, 227n41, 43 cites “The Struggle for Recognition in the Philosophy of Axel Honneth Applied to the African Renaissance,” 1999.
  78. Sato, Kazuo. “Chat and Consensus in the Japanese Traditional Meeting,” Polylog: Forum for Intercultural Philosophy 2 (2000), http://them.polylog.org/2/fsk-en.htm, cites “Akan‑Chiefs und Königsmütter im heutigen Ghana: Beispiele für Demokratie und verantwortliche Autoritäten?” (“Akan Chiefs and Queen Mothers in Contemporary Ghana: Examples of Democracy, or Accountable Authority?”), 1998, http://them.polylog.org/2/fpg-de.htm.
  79. Senghaas, Dieter “Konsensethik und Konsensdemokratie à la africaine Einige Überlegungen zur aktuellen Debatte,” Polylog: Forum für interkulturelle Philosophie 2 (2000), http://them.polylog.org/2/fsd-de.htm, cites “Akan‑Chiefs und Königsmütter im heutigen Ghana,”1998.
  80. Brunkhorst, Hauke, Hannah Arendt, C.H. Beck, 1999, p. 178 cites “Hannah Arendt on Nonviolence and Political Action,” 1993.
  81. McHugh, Nancy. “Report. The Conference on World Community and Democracy: Is the State Obsolete?” The Journal of Value Inquiry 33 (1999), 99–108 104 cites “Criticisms of Multiparty Democracy: Parallels between Wamba-dia-Wamba and Arendt,” 1998.
  82. Herzog-Punzenberger, Barbara, “Cultural Pluralism as a Challenge for Democratic Liberal Theory: Reflexive Heterogeneity as a Possible Answer” in Österreichische Zeitschrift für Politikwissenschaft (Austrian Journal of Political Science) Volume 28/2 (1999), 141-155, on pp. 144, 155, cites “Akan‑Chiefs und Königsmütter im heutigen Ghana,”1998.
  83. Diedrich, Maria, Caarl Pedersen and Justine Tally, Mapping African America: History, Narrative Formation, and the Production of Knowledge (LIT, 1999), on p. 36 cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation,” 1996.
  84. McLaughlin, Hooley. The Ends of Our Exploring: Ethical and Scientific Journeys to Remote Places. Toronto: Malcolm Lester Books, 1999, 255–256, 266, cites and discusses “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation,” 1996.
  85. Semelin, Jacques. “De la force de faibles: analyses des travaux sur la resistance civil et l’action non violente,” Review Francaise de Science Politique 48/6 (1998), 773-782, on p. 776 cites “Hannah Arendt on Nonviolence and Political Action,” 1993.
  86. Bond, Doug. “Nonviolence: Social and Psychological Issues by V. K. Kool and To Nonviolent Political Science: From Seasons of Violence by Glenn D. Paige,” Political Psychology 17:3 (September 1996), 599–604, p. 600 cites “Hannah Arendt on Nonviolence and Political Action,” 1993.
  87. May, Larry, and Jerome Kohn. Hannah Arendt: Twenty Years Later (Studies in Contemporary German Social Thought. Boston: MIT Press, 1997, 366, cites “Hannah Arendt on Nonviolence and Political Action,” 1993.
  88. Miniotaite, Grazina. “Lithuania: From Nonviolent Liberation Towards Nonviolent Defence?” Social Alternatives 16:2 (Apr 1997), 27–31, 31n 6 cites “Hannah Arendt on Nonviolence and Political Action,” 1993.

 

Citations: Dissertations and Seminar Papers

 

  1. Glass, Catherine Sian, “The relationships between livestock and human wealth, health, and wellbeing in a rural Maasai community,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of British Columbia, 2019, on p. 220 cites “Maasai Rejection of the Western Paradigm of Development: A Foucaultian Analysis,” 2000.
  2. Baker, Leroy, “Normalizing Marginality: A Critical Analysis of Blackness and Disability in Higher Education,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of Toronto, 2019, on pages 178, 254 cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation,” 1996.
  3. Villet, Charles. “The South African heterotopia: Whiteness and the postcolonial struggle for recognition beyond Apartheid,” Monash University (Melbourne), 2018, on pages 17, 138, 140, 145, 149, 150, and 175, quotes “The struggle for recognition in the philosophy of Axel Honneth,” 2003.
  4. Steinfeld, H., “Afropolitan Space Invading between Neoliberalization and Africanization,” Philosophy Ph.D. dissertation, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, 2018, on pages 81, 223, cites “Should Women Love ‘Wisdom’?” 1998.
  5. Mburu, Michael Kamau, “H. Odera Oruka and the Right to a Human Minimum: A Sagacious Quest for Global Justice,” Philosophy Ph.D. dissertation, Duquesne University, 2018, on pages 20, 66, 89, 203, and 234 cites “Sage Philosophy: Criteria that Distinguish it from Ethnophilosophy,” 2007; “Odera Oruka on Moral Reasoning,” 2000; “African Sage Philosophy and Socrates: Midwifery and Method,” 2002; and “African Sage Philosophy,” 2014.
  6. Honkasalo, Julian, “Superfluous Lives: An Arendtian Critique of Biopolitics,” Thesis, The New School, 2018, cites “Critics of Boers or Africans? Arendt’s Treatment of South Africa”, 1997.
  7. Mokwena, Gladys Kedibone, “Vocational education and training programmes for unemployed women in Winterveldt, Pretoria,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of South Africa, 2018, on pages 28, 44, 159, 161, 194, cites “Women’s Empowerment: The Insights of Wangari Maathai,” 2013.
  8. Adejumo-Ayibiowu, O.D., “An afrocentric critique of the discourse of good governance and its limitations as a means of addressing development challenges in Nigeria,” Ph.D. thesis, University of South Africa, 2018, on pages 55, 58, 123, 235, and 350 cites “African Philosophers on Global Wealth Distribution,” 2002.
  9. Mittag, Josephine, “Stolen Childhoods: Remembering the Former Child Soldiers Abducted by the Lord’s Resistance Army in Uganda,” thesis, Malmö University, Department of Global Political Studies, 2018, on pages 15, 16, 17, 30, 31, 32, 37, 41, 52, cites “The Struggle for Recognition in the Philosophy of Axel Honneth,” 2003.
  10. Höring, JS, “(Re) construindo a nova ordem: o processo constitucional angolano (1998-2010),” Ph.D. dissertation, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 2018, on pages 56, 76, 178, cites “Criticisms of Multiparty Democracy: Parallels between Wamba-dia-Wamba and Arendt,” 1998.
  11. Soto Parra, Eduardo Enrique, “Peacebuilding: Quixote House and the reintegration into community of released offenders,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of Manitoba, 2018, on pages 115, 341 cites “Dorothy Day’s Pursuit of Public Peace Through Word and Action,” 2014.
  12. Soto, Jacob C. “Implementation: Or, How Can Two Cities in Michigan Help Illustrate the Problem with Paying Too Much Attention?” The University of Texas at Austin Department of Government, Honors Thesis, 2018, on pages 38, 70 cites “Globalization and the Crisis in Detroit,” 2015.
  13. Vanner, Catherine. Violence and Learning Processes in Two Primary Schools in Kirinyaga County, Kenya. PhD. Dissertation, University of Ottawa, 2017, on pages 23, 84, 218, 221, and 169, cites “Women’s empowerment: The insights of Wangari Maathai,” 2013.
  14. Ringson, John, “Community-Based Coping Strategies for Orphans and Vulnerable Children (OVC) in Zimbabwe,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of the Witwatersrand, 2017, on pages 96, 424 cites “Sage Philosophy: Criteria that Distinguish it from Ethnophilosophy,” 2007.
  15. Fernández, S. “La construcción del espacio conradiano en “Heart of Darkness”, Lord Jim y Nostromo. A Tale of the Seaboard.” Tesis de posgrado, Doctor of Letters. Universidad Nacional de La Plata. Facultad de Humanidades y Ciencias de la Educación. En Memoria Académica, on pages 45, 230 cites “Critics of Boers or Africans?,” 1997.
  16. Aberi, George, “Intertextuality in Kenyan Policy Discourse on the Rights of Women,” Ph.D. thesis, Victoria University of Wellington, 2016, cites “Women’s empowerment: the insights of Wangari Maathai,” 2013.
  17. Abneh, Getye, “The Contribution of African Philosophy in Challenging Western Hegemony and Globalization,” Master’s thesis in Philosophy, Addis Ababa University, 2016, on pages 3, 58, 59 cites  “African Philosophers on Global Wealth Distribution,” 2002.
  18. Joseph, Benoy. “THE ROLE OF MEDIA IN ETHNIC CONFLCIT TRANSFORMATION: A CASE STUDY OF KOKRAJHAR,” Ph.D. dissertation, Peace and Conflict Studies, Sikkim University, 2016, on pages 47, 210 cites “Gandhi: The Grandfather of Conflict Transformation,”
  19. Robinson-Morris, David Wayne, “An Ontological (re)Thinking: Ubuntu and Buddhism in Higher Education” (2015). LSU Doctoral Dissertations. 2440. https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/gradschool_dissertations/2440 on pages 46, 60, 264 cites “The Wisdom of African Sages” (1997, unpublished manuscript/draft).
  20. Drescher, Christopher F. “Positive youth development in Tanzanian youth: Utility of the developmental assets approach,” The University of Mississippi, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2015. 3726813. On pages 82, 116, cites both “Should Women Love ‘Wisdom’”? 1999 and “The Wisdom of African Sages,” 1999.
  21. Nwosimiri, Ovett Kodilinye, “Rethinking the Concept of Race’s Conundrums in African Philosophy,” Master’s thesis in Philosophy, University of KwaZulu Natal, Pietermaritzburg campus, 2015, on page 120 cites “Who Counts as a Sage?,” 1998/
  22. LeJeune, John Lewis. “Hannah Arendt and the Problem of Democratic Revolution,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of California San Diego, 2014, on pp. 81, 88, 348 cites “Hannah Arendt on Power, Consent, and Coercion,” 1992; “Challenges of Founding a New Government in Iraq,” 2005.
  23. Correm, Tad, “From Force to Political Power: Frantz Fanon, M.K. Gandhi, and Hannah Arendt on Violence, Political Action and Ethics,” Ph.D. dissertation, Temple University, 2014, on pages 7, 12, 83, 98, 145, and 255 cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence,” 1996, and “Hannah Arendt on Power,” 1997.
  24. Goksel, Gulay Ugur, “The Theory of Recognition and the Integration of Immigrants,” University of Colorado at Boulder, ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing, 2014, cites “The Struggle for Recognition in the Philosophy of Axel Honneth,” 2003. (Source: Phil Index)
  25. LeJeune, John Louis. “Hannah Arendt and the Problem of Democratic Revolution,” University of California, San Diego, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2014. 3639150. On pages 81, 348 cites “Hannah Arendt on Power, Consent and Coercion,” 1992-93; on pages 88, 348, cites “Challenges of Founding New Government,” 2005.
  26. Wasike, Chrispinus J.C, “Textualizing Masculinity: Discourses of Power and Gender Relations in Manguliechi’s Babukusu After-Burial Oratory Performance (khuswala kumuse),” Ph.D. thesis, University of the Witwatersrand, 2013, on pp. 43, 44, 137, 195, 196, and 240-41 cites “the Wisdom of African Sages,” 2001, 1999; “Contemporary African Sages and Queen Mothers,” 2000; “Sage Philosophy and Critical Thinking,” 1995.
  27. Eddy, Matthew. “Recalibrating Conceptualizations of “Cultures of Peace”: A Cross-National Study of Nonviolent Attitudes.” Dissertation, University of Oregon, 2013, cites “Evaluating the Legacy of Nonviolence in South Africa,” 2006.
  28. Nordin, Sofia, “Möjligheter och svårigheter med ickevåldsmotstånd ur ett makt-, vålds- och mobiliseringsperspektiv: En jämförande fallstudie mellan Sydafrikas och Östtimors motståndsstrategier (Opportunities and Difficulties with non-violent resistance from a power, violence, and mobilization perspective: A comparative case study between South Africa and East Timor’s Resistance strategies),” Lund University Dept. of Political Science, Spring 2013, on pp. 10, 11, 20, 21, 24 and 38 cites “Evaluating the Legacy of Nonviolence in South Africa,” 2006.
  29. Perry, Katherine, “The gentle general: An examination of leadership strategies and tactics in nonviolent direct action campaigns.” Master’s thesis, Western Illinois University, J. ProQuest, Ann Arbor MI, 2013. AAI1538807. On pages 47-50, 54, 83, cites “Evaluating the Legacy of Nonviolence in South Africa,” 2006.
  30. Bhandaru, Deepa, “Undermining Whiteness: Hannah Arendt’s Participatory Freedom and the Political Ethics of Antiracism,” Philosophy Ph.D. dissertation, University of Washington, 2013, on p. 128 note 62 cites “Critics of Boers or Africans? Arendt’s Treatment of South Africa” 1997.
  31. Majeed, Hasskei Mohammed, “An Examination of the Concept of Reincarnation in African Philosophy,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of South Africa, 2012, on pp. 134-38, 225, 255 cites “Who Counts as a Sage?”, 1997.
  32. Faye, Babacar, “Political Spontaneity and Senegalese New Social Movements, Y’en a Marre and M23: A Re-reading of Frantz Fanon The Wretched of the Earth,” M.A. Thesis, Bowling Green State University, 2012, pp. 76 n. 50, 121 cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence,” 1996.
  33. Todd, Julie Marie. “Evaluating violence and (non)violence: A critical, practical theology of social change,” University of Denver and Iliff School of Theology, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2012. 3512326. On pages 161, 197, and 328 she cites “Evaluating the Legacy of Nonviolence,” 2006.
  34. Oaks, Geneva G., “The lived experience of feeling respected with fathers witnessing the births of their children,” Ph.D. dissertation, Azusa Pacific University, ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing, 2012, cites “Contemporary African Sages and Queen Mothers,” 2000. (Source: Phil Index)
  35. Masaeli, Mahmoud, “The Ethics of Recognition in International Relations: A Global and Cross-Cultural Perspective,” Dissertation, Carleton University (Canada), 2011, p. 226, 231, cites “The Struggle for Recognition in the Philosophy of Axel Honneth,” 2003.
  36. Djunatan, Stephanus., “The Principle of Affirmation: An ontological and epistemological ground of interculturality,” Doctoral dissertation, Erasmus University Rotterdam, 2011, on pp. 2, 35-39, 50-52, 55-56, 95, 144, 319, cites “Sage Philosophy: Criteria that Distinguish it from Ethnophilosophy,” 2007.
  37. Goenaga Orrego, Agustin, “Struggles for Recognition in the Postcolony: The Zapatistas and Narcocultura (2011),” APSA 2011 Annual Meeting Paper. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1902438. On pp. 7, 15, 26, 27, 33, cites “The Struggle for Recognition in the Philosophy of Axel Honneth,” 2003.
  38. Romaya, Bassam, “Philosophizing War: Arguments in the War on Iraq,” Dissertation, Temple University, 2010, pp. 11/n.10, 134/n.243, 136/n.246, 229, cites “Challenges of Founding a New Government in Iraq,” 2005.
  39. Ndlovu, Siphiwe, “Frantz Fanon and the Dialectic of Decolonisation,” Master’s degree Minor Dissertation, University of Cape Town, 2010, pp. 27, 84, cites ““Fanon and the Role of Violence in Liberation,” 1996.
  40. Thomas, Fiona, “Exploring Coping Mechanisms in Conditions of Displacement: The Struggles and Strengths of Pakistani and Somali Refugees in Nepal,” Migration Studies Unit Working Papers , Master’s dissertation, London School of Economics and Politics, 2010, cites “The Struggle for Recognition in the Philosophy of Axel Honneth,” 2003.
  41. Oriare Nyarwath, “An exposition and critique of H. Odera Oruka’s philosophy,” Ph.D. dissertation, University of Nairobi, 2009, on pp. iv acknowledges help and support, and on pp. 3, 13, 265 cites “Odera Oruka on Moral Reasoning,” 2000.
  42. Johanna Gonzalez, La théorie de la “lutte pour la reconnaissance” d’Axel Honneth et l’étude de la violence: le cas colombien” International Political Science Association website publication, 2009, 1-28, on pp. 8-10, 26, cites “The Struggle for Recognition” 2003.
  43. Karvinen, Ikali, “Spiritual Health: An Ethnographic Research About the Conceptions of Spiritual Health Held by the Kendu Hospital Staff Members,” Ph.D. dissertation, Kuopion University, on p. 68 cites “Sage Philosophy: Criteria,” 2007.
  44. Patients and the Inhabitants of the Kendu Bay Village
  45. Hockey, Neil Edward, “Learning for Liberation: Values, Actions, and Structures for Social Transformation through Aboriginal Communities,” Ph.D. dissertation, Queensland University of Technology, 2007, pp. 38, 348, cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation,” 1996.
  46. Wettstein, Florian, “Multinational Corporations and Global Justice: The Human Rights Obligations of a Quasi-Governmental Institution” (Dissertation, University of St. Gallen, 2007), cites and discusses “Hannah Arendt on Power,” 1997.
  47. Keevy, Ilze, “African Philosophical Values and Constitutionalism: A Feminist Perspective on Ubuntu as a Constitutional Value,” PhD diss., Faculty of Law, University of Free State, Bloemfontein, 2008, pp. 163, 216, 222, 490. Cites “African Sage Philosophy and Socrates: Midwifery and Method,”2002; “African Sage-Philosophers in Action: H. Odera Oruka’s Challenges to the Narrowly Academic Role of the Philosopher,” 1996; “Should Women Love ‘Wisdom’? Evaluating the Ethiopian Wisdom Tradition,” 2002.
  48. Rukundwa, Lazare Sebitereko. “Justice and Righteousness in Matthean Theology and its Relevance to the Banyamulenge Community: A Post-Colonial Reading.” PhD diss., University of Pretoria, 2006, http://upetd.up.ac.za/thesis/available/etd-09292006-145455/, 53, 62–63, 360, cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation,” 1996.
  49. Lawlor, Rachel A., “Citizenship and Identity: An analysis of Charles Taylor’s ‘ontological liberalism’ and Jürgen Habermas’s ‘discursive democracy’ as responses to the challenges of modernity and pluralism for constitutional democracies,” University of Stirling, 2006, pp. 241, 274, cites “Founding a New Government in Iraq,” 2005.
  50. Nolte-Schamm, Claudia Margarethe, “A comparison between Christian and African traditional paradigms of reconciliation and how they could dialogue for the benefit of South African society,” Doctor of Theology dissertation, School of Religion and Theology in the University of KwaZulu-Natal, 2006, on page 361 cites “The Wisdom of African Sages,” 1995.
  51. Broodryk, Johann. “Ubuntu: African Life Coping Skills, Theory and Practice” Paper presented at CCEAM Conference: Recreating Linkages between Theory and Praxis in Educational Leadership. (12–17 Oct. 2006) http://www.topkinisis.com/conference/CCEAM/wib/index/outline/PDF/BROODRYK%20Johann.pdf, 25, 31 cites “African Sage-Philosophers in Action: H. Odera Oruka’s Challenges to the Narrowly Academic Role of the Philosopher,” 1996; “Ways in Which Oral Philosophy is Superior to Written Philosophy: A Look at Odera Oruka’s Rural Sages,” 1996; “The Wisdom of African Sages,” 1999.
  52. Salles, Valéria Cristina. Social Representations Informing Discourses of Young Leaders: A Case Study of Tanzania.” PhD diss., University of Cape Town, 2005, http://www.abdl.org.br/filemanager/download/300/Young_Political_Leadership_in_Tanzania.pdf, p. 40, cites “Should Women Love ‘Wisdom’? Evaluating the Ethiopian Wisdom Tradition,” 2002.
  53. Demessie, Menna, Stephanie James, George Siasoco, and Nadia Shash, “Introduction to Ethiopian History & Culture,” in Country Report: For THE INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM, 2005, Ethiopia, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, 4-17, on page 17 cites “Should Women Love Wisdom?”, 1999.
  54. Knierzinger, Johannes. Konsensdemokratie für Afrika? Seminar paper for “Globalisierung und Philosophie” (2003–2004) http://homepage.univie.ac.at/Franz.Martin.Wimmer/stud-arbeiten/se0304arbknierzinger.pdf, 8, 14n19, 15n24, 36 cites “Akan‑Chiefs und Königsmütter im heutigen Ghana,” 1998.
  55. Brence, Steven Barry. “Multiculturalism: The Refusal and Reconstruction of Recognition.” PhD diss., University of Oregon, 2001, p. 158, cites “Fanon on the Role of Violence in Liberation,” 1996.
  56. Genter, Stefan, “Modern Afrikanische Philosophie: Henry Odera Oruka,” Seminar Paper, (GRIN Verlag, 2000), pp. 9-10, quotes and cites “Zur Praxis der afrikanischen ‘Weisen’: H. Odera Orukas Herausforderung an die Selbstbeschrankung akademischer Philosophen,

 

Citations: Acknowledgments

 

  1. Muyila, Wafula, Traditional African Communalism and the Neo-Communal Spirit in Africa, Lambert Academic Publishing, 2014, p. 2, acknowledgement.
  2. Gildert, Rob and Dennis Rothermel (Eds.), Remembrance and Reconciliation (Rodopi, 2011), p. 2, acknowledgement.
  3. Ochieng’-Odhiambo, F., Trends and Issues in African Philosophy (Peter Lang, 2010), p. x, acknowledgement.
  4. Orosco, Jose-Antonio, Cesar Chavez and the Common Sense of Nonviolence (University of New Mexico Press, 2008), p. vii, acknowledgement.
  5. Kresse, Philosophising in Mombasa: Knowledge, Islam and Intellectual Practice on the Swahili Coast (International African Library). Edinburg University Press, 2007, ix, acknowledgment.
  6. Scholz, Sally J. “Political Solidarity and Violent Resistance,” Journal of Social Philosophy 38:1 (Spring 2007), 51, acknowledgment.
  7. Struhl, Karsten J., “Is Democracy a Universal Value?: Whose Democracy?,” Radical Philosophy Today vol 5, 2007, p. 3-24, on p. 20, acknowledgment.
  8. Struhl, Karsten J. “Can There Be a Just War?,” Radical Philosophy Today, vol. 4 (2006), 3-25, on p. 23, acknowledgment.
  9. Duvenage, Pieter. Habermas and Aesthetics: The Limits of Communicative Reason. Cambridge, UK: Polity, 2003, acknowledgment.
  10. Martin, Bill. The Radical Project: Sartrean Investigations. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2000, x, acknowledgment.
  11. Liebenberg, Ian and Hussein Solomon, Consolidation of Democracy: A View from the South (Ashgate, 2000), p. ix, acknowledgement.
  12. Huntington, Patricia J. Ecstatic Subjects, Utopia, and Recognition: Kristeva, Heidegger, Irigaray. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1998, x, acknowledgment.
  13. Matuštík, Martin J. Specters of Liberation: Great Refusals in the New World Order. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1998, acknowledgments.
  14. Light, Andrew and Jonathan M. Smith, Philosophy and Geography Three: Philosophies of Place (Rowman and Littlefield, 1998), p. x, acknowledgement.
  15. Johnson, Clarence Shole. “The Philosopher as Teacher: Teaching the Canons of Western Philosophy in Historically Black Colleges: The Spellman College Experience,” Metaphilosophy 26:4 (October 1995), 413–423, 421, acknowledgment.

 

Citations: General

 

 

  1. Elizabeth A. Mosley, Cortney K. Bouse, and Kelli Stidham Hall, “After the Shutoffs in Detroit: A Case Study of Environmental and Reproductive Justice,” Civil Liberties and Public Policy… Briefing Book, online, 2017, cites “Globalization and the Crisis in Detroit,” 2015.
  2. Janz, Bruce, “Philosophy-in-Place and Texts Out of Place,” in William Sweet, ed. Migrating Texts and Traditions, Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press, 2012, 287-303, on page 301, refers to my work interviewing sages in Kenya.
  3. Maffie, James, “Ethnoepistemology,” Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (n.d.), cites my edited book, Thought and Practice in African Philosophy (2002) as an example of a study in descriptive and critical ethnoepistemology. http://www.iep.utm.edu/ethno-ep/
  4. Brendan Ritchie, “A Brief Annotated Bibliography of Ethiopian Philosophy,” lists “Should Women Love Wisdom?” (1999) as well as Thought and Practice in African Philosophy (2002). http://ethiopianphilosophy.wordpress.com/2012/04/27/a-brief-annotated-bibliography-of-ethiopian-philosophy/
  5. Gilbert, Paul, “New Issues: Goodbye to Berlin?,” Journal of Applied Philosophy 26/1, 2009, 107-111, on pp. 109, 111, mentions my edited book, Philosophical Reflections on the ‘War on Terrorism.’(2007).
  6. Biallas, Meg, “Visiting Professor Relates Teachings of MLK to War on Iraq,” Dawgnet (Butler University) (19 Nov. 19 2007) http://dawgnetnews.com/archive/071105/4498.html
  7. Mitchem, Stephanie Y. “Religious Healing as Pedagogical Performance.” In Teaching Religion and Healing. Eds. Linda Barnes and Inés Talamantez. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006, 219–218, 224 refers to my research among the Maasai in Kenya and cites an oral presentation to a class rather than a written work.
  8. Ochieng-Odhiambo, F. The Tripartite in Philosophic Sagacity,” Philosophia Africana 9:1 (March 2006), 19, 27, 32n10 discusses my work in sage philosophy.
  9. Kelbessa, Workineh. “The Utility of Ethical Dialogue for Marginalized Voices in Africa.” Discussion paper for International Institute for Empowerment and Development (IIED), (2005) http://www.policy-powertools.org/related/docs/Workineh_Kelbessa_final3.pdf, 34 discusses my involvement with cultural and educational exchange work with the Maasai of Kenya.
  10. Kresse, Kai. “Reading Mudimbe, Applying Mudimbe’, Turning an Insider Out: Problems with the Presentation of a Swahili Poet,” Journal of African Cultural Studies 17:1 (June 2005), 103–129, 105 mentions my work in sage philosophy.
  11. Gorsevski, Ellen, Peaceful Persuasion: The Geopolitics of Nonviolent Rhetoric (SUNY Press, 2004), quotes me on p. 117, cites me briefly on p. 218, n. 66.
  12. Imbo, Oluoch. Oral Traditions as Philosophy: Okot p’Bitek’s Legacy for African Philosophy. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 2002, 58 mentions my work in sage philosophy.
  13. Chukwu, Cletus N., Introduction to Philosophy in an African Perspective (Zapf Chancery, Eldoret, Kenya, 2002), refers to me on p. 329.
  14. Useem, Andrea. “Going to the Sources of Africa’s ‘Sage Philosophy,’” Chronicle of Higher Education (7 May 1999), B2. Reporter describes my sage philosophy research.
  15. Odera Oruka, H. Practical Philosophy: In Search of An Ethical Minimum (Nairobi: East African Educational Publishers, 1997), p. xvi, mentions my work in the field of African philosophy in general.

 

References (available upon request)